architecture

Shen Yun Performing Arts

From a nostalgic joyride to Easter celebrations to Chinese dance, here are some top picks to keep you busy this holiday weekend.

Broadway Corridor Exhibit-Downtown:

There's one last chance to catch "1000 Parks and a Line in The Sky" at the Institute of Texan Cultures. The exhibit, about both the past and the future in San Antonio, closes April 16.  

"We have built a fifty, almost a 60-foot model that is lit up and exhibited where we are showing a possible route for the Skyride," says Dr. Antonio Petrov, professor of architecture at UTSA.

Courtesy Weston Urban

The architects and developers behind Frost Bank’s proposed downtown San Antonio headquarters say the Alamo City skyline is lacking pizzazz, but their 400-foot, 23-story glass skyscraper could change that.

“It’s time for something new,” says Bill Butler, of Pelli Clarke Pelli architects. “The skyline is beautiful as it is--and as iconic a handful of very strong buildings make it, cities are at their best where they evolve and grow over time.”

There hasn’t been an office high-rise added to the cityscape in nearly 30 years.

The Pritzker Architecture Prize is often called the Nobel for architects, and this year's winner is 48-year-old Chilean designer Alejandro Aravena. His prestige projects include the headquarters of a pharmaceutical company in China and a dormitory at St. Edward's University in Austin, Texas.

A new tourist attraction in Argentina — The Centro Cultural Kirchner in downtown Buenos Aires — has been posting some impressive numbers since it opened in mid-May. As many as 10,000 patrons a day are trooping through an ornate, turn-of-the-last-century building that has been converted into what's said to be the fourth-largest cultural center in the world. Remarkably, everything in it is free, from video installations to comedy acts to symphony concerts.

Ford, Powell & Carson

A chance find in a basement has cast a new light on San Antonio’s not-so-distant past. It started out with an e-mail received by Trinity University Assistant Professor Kathryn O’Rourke.

“Kathryn, you’re not going to believe this. We have made this amazing discovery. I can’t even tell you over e-mail what it is, it’s so exciting.”

An intern named Jason had been sent to the basement to archive old files.

"Pretty typical intern grunt work, frankly,” said O'Rourke.

But O'Rourke says he found some sketches there that gave him pause.

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