Art

TPR Presents: The Art of Recycling

Jul 10, 2015

Families, join us on Saturday, August 15 from 1:00 to 4:00 at the Blue Star Contemporary Art Museum (116 Blue Star) for “TPR Presents: The Art of Recycling.” Come join your fellow Texas Public Radio listeners and members for a free community event that will highlight new developments in recycling in San Antonio, and also offer opportunities for kids and their parents to create their own artistic projects out of ordinary household materials (otherwise known as “junk”!).

Activities include:

Michelangelo is known for masterpieces like the Sistine Chapel and the statue of David, but most people probably don't know that he actually got his start in forgery. The great artist began his career as a forger of ancient Roman sculptures, art scholar Noah Charney tells Fresh Air's Dave Davies.

By the time Michelangelo's forgery was revealed, the Renaissance master was famous in his own right. But many other artistic forgers continue to copy the work of past artists in the hopes of passing their creations off as authentic.

Missing for nearly 75 years, a painting by Henri Matisse is being returned to the family of its rightful owner Friday. Seated Woman belonged to renowned art dealer Paul Rosenberg, who fled the Nazis in 1940.

The story of the painting's recovery reads like a historical crime novel.

Mike Morton

There’s a walking art tour happening in Boerne this weekend, but it’s got a twist to it.  That twist is its namesake. It’s called the Boerne Art Waddle. Here's the Waddle's creator Mary Morton.

“It’s called a Waddle because we have lots of ducks that come and go along the Cibolo Creek.”

The Cibolo Creek encircles the downtown neighborhood where the Art Waddle takes place—the Flats.

“Years ago when they were building the railroad a lot of the people who worked on the railroad lived in this area” she said.

“And it’s pretty flat.”

“And it’s kinda flat.”

Chicago art collectors Stefan Edlis and Gael Neeson have given a "landmark gift" of pop art to the Art Institute of Chicago, handing over 42 works that were created by Andy Warhol, Jasper Johns and others.

After the donation was officially accepted Tuesday night, the museum's president and director, Douglas Druick, told The Chicago Tribune, "This is one of the landmark gifts in our 136-year history."

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