Art

Kino Lorber

At Austin’s South By Southwest Film Festival last year, a documentary listed on the schedule caught my eye with its one-word title, “Yarn.”

It’s not often that five year olds get their art displayed in a museum. At the Institute of Texan Cultures, 250 K-12 students from Comal County now have their artwork shown in an exhibit that celebrates the history and heritage of New Braunfels. TPR’s Louisa Jonas reports a lot of work went into the multimedia show.

A couple years ago, artist and illustrator Christoph Niemann felt like he needed to shake things up. "When you do any kind of creative job for a while, you become better ..." he says, "but I think you always become a little bit more predictable."

David Martin Davies / Texas Public Radio

Vincent Valdez’s art studio is in an old San Antonio fire station built in 1910. Above the entrance stands a vintage statue of a vigilant fire fighter clutching his ax.

Inside, the art space is taken over by one colossal black and white painting — 43 feet long — broken up into six panels. It’s titled “The City.” It features 14 hooded members of the Ku Klux Klan caught in a candid moment on a bluff overlooking a city at night.

We're not going to bury the lede here: Bob Ross' hair was actually straight. Just ask his longtime business partner, Annette Kowalski, who knew Ross better than anyone — he had just gotten out of the Air Force, and was unsuccessfully trying to make a living as a painter, she says.

"He got this bright idea that he could save money on haircuts. So he let his hair grow, he got a perm, and decided he would never need a haircut again," Kowalski explains.

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