Austin

The second day of sentencing begins today in the military trial of convicted Fort Hood shooter Maj. Nidal Hasan.

The court is likely to hear more testimony from survivors and the families of those killed.

A jury found Hasan guilty of premeditated murder Friday in the November 2009 mass shooting that killed 13 and wounded 32. In the sentencing phase, the focus has shifted to the human cost of Hasan's shooting spree.

The Wendy Davis Watch continues in Texas politics. The Fort Worth state senator is expected to announce in the next few days whether she will or won’t run for the Democratic nomination for Governor. But Democratic activists aren’t the only ones waiting.

So are potential Democratic candidates, as state-wide races up and down the ticket, so far, remain empty. 

Update: Army Maj. Nidal Hasan has been found guilty on all counts of premeditated murder and attempted murder in the 2009 shooting rampage at Fort Hood. Hasan now faces either life in prison or the death penalty. Sentencing begins Monday. 

Army psychiatrist Hasan acted as his own attorney in the case – but he did so little in his own defense that his standby counsel expressed concern that he was purposely seeking the death penalty.

Sentencing begins Monday. The sentencing phase runs similarly to a trial. The 13 members of the military panel will decide Hasan’s sentence—not the judge. Prosecutors  are expected to call 19 witnesses, including family members. They’re expected to talk about the grief they experienced losing a loved one.

Update: The jury in the court martial of Major Nidal Hasan has begun to deliberate. They're considering whether or not Hasan is guilty of 13 counts of premeditated murder and 32 counts of premeditated attempted murder in the Fort Hood shooting in 2009. 

Update: Texas Democratic Party chairman Gilberto Hinojosa has released a statement explaining the new website gathering support for a Davis run for Governor.

"We know she can win this race. Wendy has faced long odds before – and they've never stopped her. But before she decides to run, we need to show her that we have her back."

Original post (12:04 p.m.): Texas Democrats appear on the fence over whether Sen. Wendy Davis, D-Fort Worth, should run for governor in 2014 – much like the candidate herself.

But with nobody else on the ballot so far, the minority party is ramping up its efforts to make sure their new rising star will have money and manpower – just in case.

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