baroque

Elias Gottlob Haussmann / Wikipedia Commons

“There just aren’t enough opportunities for people living in San Antonio to hear baroque music,” says Amy Pikler, a violist with the San Antonio Symphony, who also plays recorder. “Most classical concerts don’t even include one piece of baroque music. You don’t hear Bach and Telemann as often as you hear Tchaikovsky, Rachmaninoff, and Brahms, and I think that people should know that [baroque music] is just as good in a different way. I really want people to hear it and I think that they deserve to hear it.”

Hannah Holzwarth Photography

There's a concert Sunday afternoon that's classical music but you may not know about the instruments -- they're a little different than what we hear and see today.

Sony Classical

In a move bound to delight new listeners but sure to raise the hackles of classical music purists, the new soundtrack for Whit Stillman’s film “Love & Friendship” takes the work of over a dozen composers and blends them together to create a pleasing listening experience akin to the “Baroque Greats” channel on Pandora.

Keith Womer

A pair of musicians is coming to San Antonio, and the music they create will probably sound different from anything you’d expect. They’re part of an Austin ensemble called La Follia Austin Baroque

Justin Cole Photography

The Austin Baroque Orchestra comes to San Antonio two or three times a year. I spoke to their artistic director to find out what sets them apart; mostly it’s the instruments they use to make the music they play. Like this one: a theorbo.

"Theorbo: it’s a really large lute with really large bass strings on it,” said Billy Traylor.

“It usually sticks up a good three or four feet above the head of the person playing it. It’s a very long-necked instrument.”

Some of instruments are unfamiliar, but the music they make doesn’t sound so different.

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