beer

Here's how popular craft brewed beer is these days: On average, a new brewery opens its doors every single day in the the U.S.

Congressman Patrick McHenry is a man who knows his beer. The refrigerator in his Capitol Hill office is filled to the brim with it. The Republican's district includes the city of Asheville, N.C., which claims it has more breweries per capita than any other U.S. city.

Listen up, cub reporters. Lesson 1: Never miss an opportunity to catch a good story. I was doing important hop research at my local craft beer emporium, aka my bar.

"This red IPA is great. What is this again?" I asked the bartender.

"That's Line 51. From Oakland. The owner, P.T., does it part time. He has a day job." What's he do? I asked. "He's a schoolteacher."

Bingo! Secret teachers, you can't hide from this NPR Ed sleuth, no sir.

Manuel Sebastian Vogt

“Save The World” may be a lofty title for a brewery, but as Master Brewer and co-owner Dr. David Rathkamp says, he hopes to save the world, one beer at a time. Far-fetched? The brewery donates ten percent of its monthly gross sales to various charities. Then at year’s end, the brewery gives all the profits away.

 Save The World Brewing Company is the brain-child of a married couple, both of them physicians who abandoned medicine in pursuit of a path they anticipate will fulfill their dreams.

In the late 1970s, a young Southern California beer enthusiast named Bill Sysak began doing something quite novel at the time. He bought cases of beer and stashed the bottles in his basement to age like wine. Over several years, Sysak discovered that some beers could develop rich flavors — like toffee and caramel — not present in their youth. Excited by what he found, Sysak ramped up his cellaring program and made it a full-time hobby.

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