Bioscience-Medicine

Bioscience-Medicine news from Texas Public Radio reporters.

Texas Public Radio is supported by contributors to the Bioscience-Medicine News Desk including  Xenex Disinfection Services, the John and Rita Feik Foundation, the John and Susan Kerr Charitable Foundation, the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, Jean Cheever and San Antonio Technology Center.  Additional support comes from Cappy and Suzy Lawton and InCube Labs.

Wendy Rigby / Texas Public Radio

The misuse of prescription drugs is on the rise in the U-S, fueling the growing opioid epidemic. That’s why disposing of unused medications the right way is so important.

This weekend, MedDropSA is hosting a drug drop off event. It’s Saturday from 8 until 1 at Alamo City Christian Fellowship Church, 6500 Interstate 35 North.

You must present a picture ID and a recent copy of your CPS bill to qualify to use the service.

Wendy Rigby / Texas Public Radio

Of the 20 locally-acquired cases of Chagas disease in 2016 in Texas, Bexar County had the most. Chagas disease is caused by a parasite carried by kissing bugs. This rare condition is now catching the attention of the local medical community.

Lyssa Ochoa, MD

Vascular surgeons say Peripheral Artery Disease – or P.A.D. – is one of the most underdiagnosed medical conditions in America. If left untreated, it can cause major mobility problems, or it can even be fatal. In today’s TPR Lifeline, Bioscience-Medicine reporter Wendy Rigby talks to Lyssa Ochoa, MD, a vascular surgeon with Peripheral Vascular Associates in San Antonio.

Wendy Rigby / Texas Public Radio

The public is invited to a free public forum on Latino Health in San Antonio Tuesday night.

The UT Health San Antonio School of Nursing is hosting the event.

Topics range from access to health care, issues for Latinos within the health care system, and the stigmas some Latinos face when they seek help.

Anyone is welcome to attend the free forum  at 5:30 p.m. tomorrow at the Menger Hotel.

Wendy Rigby / Texas Public Radio

A new case study published in a national journal predicts that the implementation of a sweeping diabetes prevention program in San Antonio could save more than $400 million dollars in healthcare related costs over 20 years.

Diabetes is a huge problem in the Alamo City, impacting an estimated 14 percent of the population.

  

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