Black History Month

Public domain

Ragtime was an American musical style which enjoyed popularity between 1895 and 1918. It had its origins in African-American circles, bringing fame and publishing contracts to many Black American composers of the era.

In November, 1970, pianist Joshua Rifkin released the first of three recordings of rags for the Nonesuch label. "Scott Joplin: Piano Rags" went on to become Nonesuch's first million-selling release, marking the beginning of a ragtime revival.

 

Courtesy Photo

As San Antonio celebrates its Tricentennial anniversary, are we telling the entirety of the city's story? Is enough attention being paid to the contributions of different ethnic groups over time? 


Willie Ruff, In His Own Words

Feb 20, 2015
willieruff.com

I first heard of Willie Ruff in the mid 1980s when a casual friend gave me a cassette tape of Mr. Ruff playing Gregorian Chant at the Basilica of St. Luke's in Venice. It was not until years later that I ran across his autobiography, “A Call to Assembly.” Ever since then, I've wanted to know more about him. Over the years, I've collected most of his recordings, but have until now never had the opportunity to actually speak with him. I give credit to a snowy day in Connecticut that I finally got the interview I've dreamed about.

Nathan Cone

"The Migration Project" is a three-year initiative of The Renaissance Guild, a local black theater. It is the theatrical exploration of the historical and cultural identity of African-Americans, and by extension America. The issues generated by mass migration in the United States and in Europe have taken on a complex and often divisive urgency in recent years.

courtesy Institute of Texan Cultures

They’re a part of the American West that doesn’t get a lot of attention, but maybe it’s high time they did.  They were called the Buffalo Soldiers, and the Institute of Texan Cultures wants you to know about them.

“Buffalo Soldiers after the Civil War became very prevalent in West Texas as it led up into the Indian Wars.”

Greg Garret’s an Education Specialist with the Institute.

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