Books

The Source - July 30, 2014
2:44 pm
Wed July 30, 2014

The Source: Big Money In Politics

Credit Flickr user 401(K) 2012 / cc

Recent Supreme Court rulings have helped the influx of mega money and their donors into political campaigns.

Kenneth Vogel has been tracking it for Politico and describes the post-Citizen's United universe in his new book, "Big Money, 2.5 Billion Dollars, One Suspicious Vehicle, and a Pimp--on the Trail of the Ultra-Rich Hijacking American Politics."

Guest

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The Source - July 30, 2014
11:59 am
Wed July 30, 2014

The Source: Is Amazon An Anti-Trust Case In Waiting?

Credit Matt Gibson / cc

Amazon is the big kid on the block of both online book selling and bookselling in general, controlling a large portion of the U.S. market.

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The Source - July 28, 2014
11:01 am
Mon July 28, 2014

The Source: From Prison To Peace, A 25-Year Journey For Michael Morton

Credit courtesy michael-morton.com / ©

The now famous case of Michael Morton looms over Texas law, law enforcement, and legal procedure. 

Convicted of murdering his wife, Morton was sentenced to life in prison in 1987, but would later be completely exonerated fro the crime. It is a cautionary reminder of what happens when overzealous law officials and prosecutors decide the facts of a crime rather than investigate it. 

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The Source - July 21, 2014
12:44 pm
Mon July 21, 2014

The Source: Public Investment Not A Silver Bullet

Populous

  The promise of downtown development in the form of convention centers has sparked the revitalization efforts in several cities. Rarely do people go back to make sure the promises were fulfilled.

In his new book, "Convention Center Follies," University of Texas San Antonio Professor Heywood Sanders highlights several cities where the promise was fueled by fuzzy math and circular logic.

Guest:

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The Source - July 17, 2014
9:56 am
Thu July 17, 2014

The Source: A Biography Of The Second Amendment

Open Carry Texas at the Alamo
Paul Flahive ©

    

In very few places has the syntax of a sentence caused more excitement, passion, hatred, and hyperbole than the Second Amendment in the Bill of Rights.

"A well regulated Militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be infringed."

Is the militia a limitation on who gets guns? The people an afterthought? Or, is it the other way around and the militia is the less important of the two?

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The Source - July 15, 2014
2:12 pm
Tue July 15, 2014

The Source: Politics Is A Joke

Credit Flickr user Cliff / cc

In a 2007 Pew Poll, Jon Stewart was ranked as one of the most admired journalists in the country. The problem being that "The Daily Show" host is actually a comedian, and his news-skewering show is not, in-fact, news.

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Arts & Culture
4:22 pm
Wed July 9, 2014

Pilot Gino Narboni On His Incredible Life And Autobiography

Gino Narboni as a young pilot.
Gino Narboni

Now here's somebody who's led an interesting life.  He’s Gino Narboni. And no, he’s not Italian.

“I started in North Africa, in Algeria,” he said.

He’s a softspoken 90-something-year-old man now, but what a life he’s led. He ran off to join General de Gaulle’s free French movement. When they asked him what he wanted to do, he said, "I want to fly. Ha! I was barely 20 at the time.”

The free French didn’t have any airplanes then, but Gino eventually got his wish.

“I was sent to the United States for pilot training,” he said.

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The Source - July 9, 2014
11:05 am
Wed July 9, 2014

The Source: 'How Culture Affects Madness'

Universal Studios

  When Dr. Joel Gold met a patient who thought his every action was being filmed and broadcast to the world a la "The Truman Show" he was intrigued but it wasn't until a steady stream of people with similar delusions that he and his brother decided to write about it.

In his new book, "Suspicious Minds: How Culture Affects Madness," Gold makes the case for how our environments are affecting our thoughts and sometimes causing our delusions.

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Book Your Trip
3:13 pm
Tue July 8, 2014

In 'Little Engine That Could,' Some See An Early Feminist Hero

Was "I think I can" the great-grandmother of "lean in?" Some readers see the plucky locomotive as a parable about working women, but some versions of the story feature a male protagonist instead.
Platt & Munk, Penguin Young Readers Group

Originally published on Tue July 8, 2014 7:23 pm

"Chug, chug, chug. Puff, puff, puff. Ding-dong, ding-dong."

The beloved tale of the little blue engine — who helps bring a broken-down train of toys to the good little boys and girls on the other side of the mountain — has been chugging along for a very long time. But despite the locomotive's optimistic refrain — I think I can, I think I can, I think I can — the story has a somewhat checkered past: In its tracks, The Little Engine has left both a legal battle and a debate over whether the little blue engine is male or female.

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The Source - July 7, 2014
1:53 pm
Mon July 7, 2014

The Source: Keeping U.S. Military Technology From Falling Into The Wrong Hands

The efforts to keep high-tech military technology out of the hands of enemy states and combatants  comes to light in the book "Operation Shakespeare." 

Investigative reporter John Shiffman tells us about Homeland Security's three-year effort to block and apprehend arms traders from accessing some of America's leading technologies. 

Guest:

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