Books

Books News & Features
8:49 pm
Thu April 3, 2014

Barry Lopez: American Literary Icon

Barry Lopez
Credit David Liittschwager/Barry Lopez

"There is a way in which the arts serve humanity and are not just entertainment. That seems to be the drift at the moment, that the arts are there to entertain us, but that's not why human beings became dedicated artists. Even if they were driven by individual artistic vision, there's a social impulse behind the desire to create art." Barry Lopez

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The Source - April 3, 2014
12:08 pm
Thu April 3, 2014

The Source: Bill White On Our "Fiscal Constitution"

Former Houston Mayor and Democratic candidate for Texas governor Bill White says that the country is being misled and that a fundamental principle in America's management has been broken.

In his new book, "America's Fiscal Constitution: Its Triumph and Collapse," White makes the case that the out-of-control spending that started under President George W. Bush has departed from the nation's history; a history that saw our "fiscal constitution" shredded.

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Arts & Culture
2:18 pm
Wed April 2, 2014

Jane Pauley Looks Forward To Your Questions At SA Book Festival

Jane Pauley.
Kelly Campbell

TV news anchor and author Jane Pauley is coming to the San Antonio Book Festival on Saturday. I spoke to her Wednesday, and it doesn’t take long before her Midwestern humility comes through.

“I’m going to be mixing with my betters, with authors and people who read books, and it’s very exciting to be in a crowd such as that." After a half step, Pauley added with a laugh: "And to be in San Antonio on top of it!”

She’s one of many authors who will be at the downtown library for what she calls not a speech, but a moderated conversation.

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The Source - March 27, 2014
1:09 pm
Thu March 27, 2014

The Source: The Legacy Of The 'Red Scare' In Texas

When "Red Scare: Right-Wing Hysteria, Fifties Fanaticism, and Their Legacy in Texas" was first published in 1985 it won the Texas State Historical Society's prize for best book on Texas History.

Now nearly 30 years later, it has been republished by the University of Texas Press and is still resounds with the ideas of political messaging, group think and the darker parts of our common history.

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The Source - March 18, 2014
11:18 am
Tue March 18, 2014

The Source: Financial Meltdowns Aplenty

  Economic busts role through the centuries debilitating states along with them. The Roman Empire of Emperor Severus in the third century collapsed in no small part due to economic depression. The United States has experiences several busts from its inception to the 2008 financial meltdown.  Speculation drives bubbles or financial fevers -- until the bottom falls out.

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Arts & Culture
5:05 pm
Fri March 14, 2014

From Ballet To Author: An Unusual Path

Mario Alberto Zambrano
Nephi Nevin

A first-time author is coming to the San Antonio Book Festival next month, and I came to find that his back story is as fascinating as the book he’s written. Meet Mario Alberto Zambrano, whose novel-writing career began on the stage.

“I was a dancer for a very long time. I never read as a kid and I never wrote short stories…”

Being an author is Zambrano's second life, after retiring from an international career as a ballet dancer, he began writing. Surprisingly his first novel was picked up.

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NPR Story
7:13 pm
Wed March 12, 2014

Lost Work By Jack Kerouac Finally Published

Merrimack River in Lowell, Jack Kerouac's hometown. (Casey Ashlock)

Originally published on Wed March 12, 2014 2:16 pm

The writer Jack Kerouac is best known for his 1957 novel “On The Road,” but he wrote many other books and one of them has been lost to history until now.

“The Haunted Life” has just been published for the first time (excerpt below). It’s a coming of age story set in Galloway, a fictionalized version of Kerouac’s hometown of Lowell, Mass., in 1940 before the U.S. entered World War II.

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Arts & Culture
4:08 pm
Wed March 12, 2014

"Ranch Philosophy" On Display In New Photo Book

Goats and Hillingdon Ranch
courtesy David K. Langford

There's a new photo book out now by David K. Langford about his family’s Hill Country Ranch, and if you look back at the ranch’s history, it’s clear that their ranching philosophy is an extension of the property’s founder, Alfred Giles, a well-known South Texas architect in whose buildings you may have stood.  

As Langford explains, when Giles established his ranch outside Comfort, his ranching philosophy has two themes.

“Always plan for drought. Always. And the second thing is if you have to feed, you have too many. Water is everything.”

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Fronteras
2:09 pm
Fri February 28, 2014

Central American Children Look North To Flee Violence & Find Their Mothers

Photo courtesy Sonia Nazario

Fronteras: Some Maricopa County sheriff’s deputies in Arizona have agreed to go through a round of cultural training to help curb tensions with indigenous and Latino residents. Some members of San Diego's LGBT community are not embracing a new ad by Republican congressional candidate Carl DeMaio, who is gay. Authorities are seeing a huge increase in Central American asylum-seekers at the nation's borders. Also, a conversation with Pulitzer Prize-winning author and journalist Sonia Nazario about the surge in immigrants from Central America.

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Arts & Culture
3:39 pm
Wed February 12, 2014

San Antonio Book Festival Announces Visiting Authors

San Antonio Book Festival
Katy Flato

Some San Antonians have been waiting with baited breath to see who will be appearing at the upcoming book festival. I've got the details but first, for those of you who don’t know about the .

“It’s just a chance for some of the nation’s best writers to be in conversation with one another and for people in San Antonio to engage with them for free," said San Antonio Book Festival Literary Director Clay Smith. "This festival is a gift to the city.”

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