Books

NPR Story
7:13 pm
Wed March 12, 2014

Lost Work By Jack Kerouac Finally Published

Merrimack River in Lowell, Jack Kerouac's hometown. (Casey Ashlock)

Originally published on Wed March 12, 2014 2:16 pm

The writer Jack Kerouac is best known for his 1957 novel “On The Road,” but he wrote many other books and one of them has been lost to history until now.

“The Haunted Life” has just been published for the first time (excerpt below). It’s a coming of age story set in Galloway, a fictionalized version of Kerouac’s hometown of Lowell, Mass., in 1940 before the U.S. entered World War II.

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Arts & Culture
4:08 pm
Wed March 12, 2014

"Ranch Philosophy" On Display In New Photo Book

Goats and Hillingdon Ranch
courtesy David K. Langford

There's a new photo book out now by David K. Langford about his family’s Hill Country Ranch, and if you look back at the ranch’s history, it’s clear that their ranching philosophy is an extension of the property’s founder, Alfred Giles, a well-known South Texas architect in whose buildings you may have stood.  

As Langford explains, when Giles established his ranch outside Comfort, his ranching philosophy has two themes.

“Always plan for drought. Always. And the second thing is if you have to feed, you have too many. Water is everything.”

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Fronteras
2:09 pm
Fri February 28, 2014

Central American Children Look North To Flee Violence & Find Their Mothers

Photo courtesy Sonia Nazario

Fronteras: Some Maricopa County sheriff’s deputies in Arizona have agreed to go through a round of cultural training to help curb tensions with indigenous and Latino residents. Some members of San Diego's LGBT community are not embracing a new ad by Republican congressional candidate Carl DeMaio, who is gay. Authorities are seeing a huge increase in Central American asylum-seekers at the nation's borders. Also, a conversation with Pulitzer Prize-winning author and journalist Sonia Nazario about the surge in immigrants from Central America.

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Arts & Culture
3:39 pm
Wed February 12, 2014

San Antonio Book Festival Announces Visiting Authors

San Antonio Book Festival
Katy Flato

Some San Antonians have been waiting with baited breath to see who will be appearing at the upcoming book festival. I've got the details but first, for those of you who don’t know about the .

“It’s just a chance for some of the nation’s best writers to be in conversation with one another and for people in San Antonio to engage with them for free," said San Antonio Book Festival Literary Director Clay Smith. "This festival is a gift to the city.”

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Fronteras Desk
2:40 pm
Fri February 7, 2014

People In ACA 'Affordability Gap' Risk Future In Medical Debt

Percentage of persons under age 65 in families having problems paying medical bills in the past 12 months, by poverty status and 6-month interval: United States, January 2011–June 2012.
CDC/NCHS

Fronteras: The Affordable Care Act aims to increase access to healthcare, but for those in the so-called "affordability gap" insurance may still be out of reach. We speak to Politico about a program just launched to provide scholarships for undocumented student immigrants. Also, it was 150 years ago that Mexico was invaded by the French and ruled by Maximilian. It was a time of betrayals, brutality and war, but who was Maximilian?

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The Source - February 6, 2014
1:37 pm
Thu February 6, 2014

The Source: Education In America

Flickr user Bill Selak cc

In the first segment:

The debate over vouchers is heating up on the national level with proposed legislation, "The Scholarship for Kids Act of 2014" to give federal dollars to students opting out of public school. School choice is the best way for underserved communities to get a good education, say conservatives pushing this legislation.

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Arts & Culture
9:16 am
Tue February 4, 2014

Local High School Girls Win Book Festival Writing Prize

Lee HS Principal Rick Canales; SA Public Library Foundation President Tracey Bennett; NESA 9th grader and winner Rhyanne Saul with her family; and Texas Cavaliers Publicity Chairman Clint Hennessey
Robert Shaw

There’s something amazingly optimistic about seeing young people attaining goals. Yesterday I saw a pair doing just that. The San Antonio Book Festival had asked local high school students to write an essay with the theme: A river runs through it.

I went along as winners were informed.

"Oh, I won?" said Jessica Redmon, the 11th grade winner, shocked to see a TV camera, her grandmother and a dozen people invade her classroom. Jessica wrote about the summer her sister and she experienced, but she started the project by doing this.

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The Two-Way
9:24 am
Tue January 28, 2014

Book News: Mexican Poet Jose Emilio Pacheco Dies At 74

Mexican writer Jose Emilio Pacheco poses for the photographers after the Cervantes Prize ceremony on April 23, 2010, in Madrid.
Carlos Alvarez Getty Images

Originally published on Tue January 28, 2014 6:22 am

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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The Source - January 22, 2014
11:07 am
Wed January 22, 2014

The Source: Emergency Care Waves 'Red Flags' | 30 Years With CIA

EdTech Stanford School of Medicine

In the first segment:

Texas is failing its patients in emergency services. In areas like access and injury prevention Texas scored failing marks in a new study that saw the state fall to 38th in the nation for emergency care.

What is San Antonio is doing to turn the trend around?

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Book Reviews
9:11 am
Wed January 22, 2014

Music And Chemistry Are An Explosive Combination In 'Orfeo'

W.W. Norton

Originally published on Thu January 23, 2014 1:47 pm

Richard Powers, whose novels combine the wonders of science with the marvels of art, astonishes us in different ways with each new book. His 11th, Orfeo, is about a 70-year-old avant-garde composer who has sacrificed family and fortune to his relentless pursuit of immortal, transcendent music.

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