Books

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They are more cosmopolitan, less religious, and more educated than their parents and grandparents. The millennials of the Arab world are going to change the way we think of the Middle East and North Africa, argues Juan Cole in his new book, "The New Arabs."

Cole, who has been writing about the interaction between the Muslim World and the West for years, points to the fact that the internet-savvy citizens of Libya,  Egypt and Tunisia used their skills to topple their repressive governments.

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Recent Supreme Court rulings have helped the influx of mega money and their donors into political campaigns.

Kenneth Vogel has been tracking it for Politico and describes the post-Citizen's United universe in his new book, "Big Money, 2.5 Billion Dollars, One Suspicious Vehicle, and a Pimp--on the Trail of the Ultra-Rich Hijacking American Politics."

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Amazon is the big kid on the block of both online book selling and bookselling in general, controlling a large portion of the U.S. market.

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The now famous case of Michael Morton looms over Texas law, law enforcement, and legal procedure. 

Convicted of murdering his wife, Morton was sentenced to life in prison in 1987, but would later be completely exonerated fro the crime. It is a cautionary reminder of what happens when overzealous law officials and prosecutors decide the facts of a crime rather than investigate it. 

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  The promise of downtown development in the form of convention centers has sparked the revitalization efforts in several cities. Rarely do people go back to make sure the promises were fulfilled.

In his new book, "Convention Center Follies," University of Texas San Antonio Professor Heywood Sanders highlights several cities where the promise was fueled by fuzzy math and circular logic.

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