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In a 2007 Pew Poll, Jon Stewart was ranked as one of the most admired journalists in the country. The problem being that "The Daily Show" host is actually a comedian, and his news-skewering show is not, in-fact, news.

Gino Narboni

Now here's somebody who's led an interesting life.  He’s Gino Narboni. And no, he’s not Italian.

“I started in North Africa, in Algeria,” he said.

He’s a softspoken 90-something-year-old man now, but what a life he’s led. He ran off to join General de Gaulle’s free French movement. When they asked him what he wanted to do, he said, "I want to fly. Ha! I was barely 20 at the time.”

The free French didn’t have any airplanes then, but Gino eventually got his wish.

“I was sent to the United States for pilot training,” he said.

Universal Studios

  When Dr. Joel Gold met a patient who thought his every action was being filmed and broadcast to the world a la "The Truman Show" he was intrigued but it wasn't until a steady stream of people with similar delusions that he and his brother decided to write about it.

In his new book, "Suspicious Minds: How Culture Affects Madness," Gold makes the case for how our environments are affecting our thoughts and sometimes causing our delusions.

"Chug, chug, chug. Puff, puff, puff. Ding-dong, ding-dong."

The beloved tale of the little blue engine — who helps bring a broken-down train of toys to the good little boys and girls on the other side of the mountain — has been chugging along for a very long time. But despite the locomotive's optimistic refrain — I think I can, I think I can, I think I can — the story has a somewhat checkered past: In its tracks, The Little Engine has left both a legal battle and a debate over whether the little blue engine is male or female.

The efforts to keep high-tech military technology out of the hands of enemy states and combatants  comes to light in the book "Operation Shakespeare." 

Investigative reporter John Shiffman tells us about Homeland Security's three-year effort to block and apprehend arms traders from accessing some of America's leading technologies.