Border

Courtesy Jen Reel/Texas Observer

An abandoned inhaler, a pendant without a chain, a single shoe - these are only a few of the many things left behind by missing migrants who journeyed to cross the U.S./Mexico border. 

An ongoing project by The Texas Observer photographs and publishes these found items online in a database called "Yo Tengo Nombre," or "I Have A Name," in an effort to help families identify loved ones who are missing or may have perished.

COURTESY Julian Aguilar / Texas Tribune

Texas has allocated $800 million to stopping migrants and drugs from crossing into the U.S. during the 2016 and 2017 fiscal years. Yet these efforts may not compensate for the ongoing exchange of drugs, guns and labor.

The Texas Tribune's Bordering on Insecurity project looks at the demand for foreign workers and contraband in the United States, plus how these economic opportunities can affect the state's immigration policy. 

Wooing Latino Voters On The Border In The Year Of Trump

Oct 21, 2016

Arizona's Santa Cruz County on the Mexican border is what Republican operative Sergio Arellano jokingly calls "Democrat heaven." Only 16 percent of voters are registered as Republicans. More than 80 percent of the population is Latino.

Arellano has been trying to lure more of these voters to the GOP, but this campaign season has been tricky.

"What we encounter on the grass-roots is, 'Republicans are racist. Republicans and Trump want to deport everybody, want to build the wall,'" said Arellano.

AARON SCHRANK/TPR

Dr. Hector Gonzalez is standing on the Laredo side of the Gateway to the Americas International Bridge—staring across the Rio Grande at Nuevo Laredo, Mexico.

“The majority of trailers, the majority of people, pedestrians, the majority of cargo--comes through Laredo,” says Gonzalez, director of Laredo’s Health Department. “But that also, for us, implies disease.”

Michel Marizco / Fronteras


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