Border

AARON SCHRANK/TPR

Dr. Hector Gonzalez is standing on the Laredo side of the Gateway to the Americas International Bridge—staring across the Rio Grande at Nuevo Laredo, Mexico.

“The majority of trailers, the majority of people, pedestrians, the majority of cargo--comes through Laredo,” says Gonzalez, director of Laredo’s Health Department. “But that also, for us, implies disease.”

Michel Marizco / Fronteras


Jean Guerrero / KPBS Public Radio

Following are stories airing this week on Texas Public Radio's "Fronteras."

·         There’s a processing backlog at the southern California border where Haitian immigrants are overwhelming customs officials.

·         The Supreme Court ruled in favor of Texas abortion clinics but now they’re struggling to reopen.

·         Residents in New Mexico's South Valley live near polluting industries.  Now they’ve scored a victory in their quest for a place where kids can play.

David Wright / KUNM

This week on Fronteras:

·         Some evidence that New Mexico state workers may have falsified applications for emergency food stamps. 

·         A five-state survey shows many Americans in the Southwest feel financially squeezed by the costs of healthcare.

·         In Dallas, a program is helping low income families learn vital parenting skills.

·         A new Austin development raises concern because it’s next to an ancestral cemetery housing graves of the enslaved.

·         An artist travels along the Old Spanish Trail for a new exhibit at Albuquerque’s National Hispanic Cultural Center.

Bexar County

This week on Fronteras:  

·         A federal lawsuit against the border city of El Paso aims to stop the city from jailing poor traffic offenders who can’t pay their fines.

·         Dallas police test the new sponge gun- an alternative to shooting suspects with bullets.

·         Racial slur incident at Texas A&M sparks a teaching symposium

·         In San Diego, homeless children of immigrants may not get the help they need to stay in school.

·         A new exhibit shows how the Spanish colonized Bexar County centuries ago. 

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