border issues

Music
1:10 pm
Sat April 12, 2014

Borderland Music: Songs From The U.S.-Mexico Frontera

Ricky Munoz, lead singer of Intocalbe, performs in Juarez, Mexico earlier this month. Intocable, a band popular on both sides of the border, is inspired by Mexican music, country hits and rock bands like Def Leppard.
Kainaz Amaria/NPR

Originally published on Mon April 14, 2014 10:01 am

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Border Security
9:27 am
Tue April 8, 2014

Leaders At DPS And Texas National Guard Say Border Crime Is Getting Worse

 A select number of Texas senators heard from groups operating along the Texas-Mexico border this week. This group of lawmakers is looking ahead of the 2015 legislative session for the possibility of increasing the state budget for border security.

Lawmakers seated on the Texas Senate Committee on Agriculture, Rural Affairs and Homeland Security heard from Col. Steve McCraw, the head of the Texas Department of Public Safety, about their operations along the border. 

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Fronteras
1:40 pm
Fri April 4, 2014

The Feast of San Sebastian: A Dark Tale Of Human Trafficking In Puerto Rico

La Perla community in Puerto Rico.
Jonathan Marcantoni

Fronteras: One of the fastest growing cities in the Southwest is squeezing out pronghorn antelope. For the first time in almost 20 years, the Colorado River is flowing into northern Mexico through a dam that usually stops it. Some estimates show that the Obama administration has hit two million deportations, which is prompting protests across the country. Also, we speak to San Antonio Author Jonathan Marcantoni about his book, "The Feast of San Sebastian," human trafficking in Puerto Rico and his Puerto Rican identity.

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Texas Politics
12:56 pm
Wed April 2, 2014

Texas Republicans Split On Immigrant Guest Worker Program In Party Platform

David Martin Davies TPR News

There is a stir among Texas Republicans on whether or not the party will keep a guest worker program as part of its campaign platform when the party meets in June.

Land Commissioner Jerry Patterson has long been a proponent of what has been labeled a "Texas solution," which would allow undocumented workers without a criminal record to remain in Texas for a job.

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Fronteras
2:14 pm
Fri March 28, 2014

Steve Inskeep On Reporting From The "Borderland"

Texas rancher Dob Cunningham, right, stands on the edge of his 800-acre ranch in Quemado, Texas, which touches the Rio Grande. On the other side, Mexico.
Kainaz Amaria NPR

Fronteras: A conversation with "Morning Edition" host Steve Inskeep, who joins us to talk about NPR’s Borderland series: stories about the people, goods and culture that cross back and forth across the U.S.-Mexico border. Mónica Ortiz Uribe introduces us to the Barrio Aztecas of El Paso, one of the more frightening gangs that operate on the border. Lent is a time of spiritual reflection, but it also means a change in diet for those who take part. Fronteras commentator Yvette Benavides tells us about how the foods of lent can be sinfully good.

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Parallels
4:49 am
Mon March 24, 2014

Troncoso Family Finds Success On U.S. Side Of Border With Mexico

Originally published on Mon March 24, 2014 11:25 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

About midway through our road trip along the U.S./Mexico border, my colleagues and I rode up a mountain. Okay. Should we hop in?

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: Hop in.

INSKEEP: We boarded a tram car suspended by a cable.

KAINAZ AMARIA: Are we going that way?

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Borderlands
3:00 am
Mon March 24, 2014

On The Mend, But Wounds Of Violence Still Scar Juarez

Workers arrive at an assembly plant located along the border.
Kainaz Amaria NPR

Originally published on Mon March 24, 2014 11:25 am

We had just finished our time in Juarez, Mexico, when we had dinner with some distant relations on the U.S. side of the border. "You," one of my relatives said, "are the first Juarez survivors we've seen in some time."

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Parallels
3:31 am
Thu March 20, 2014

At The Border, The Drugs Go North And The Cash Goes South

Many drug cartel members die young, and when they do, their families often spend lavishly to construct mausoleums that look like small condos.
John Burnett NPR

Originally published on Thu March 20, 2014 10:07 am

The international drug trade goes in two directions: Narcotics go north and money goes south. All the drug profits made on the streets of U.S. cities like Chicago and Atlanta and Dallas are funneled down to ports of entry on the U.S.-Mexico border where they're smuggled back into Mexico. In 2012, one federal agency alone, Immigration and Customs Enforcement, seized $411 million in cash hidden in vehicles, mostly heading south.

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Border & Immigration
12:19 pm
Wed March 19, 2014

Farmers, Ranchers Calling For Immigration Reform

Farmers and ranchers from across the United States are calling for action on immigration reform. The Texas Farm Bureau is asking Congress to “get ‘er done” to help farmers compete.

Texas Farm Bureau State Director Russell Boening runs a dairy farm just south of San Antonio. But this week he is in Washington, D.C., at the National Press Club talking about immigration reform.

“Some of our labor is going to have to be imported or more of our food is going to be imported. So I hope we can get that message across to all of our leaders," he said.

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Latin America
4:02 am
Wed March 5, 2014

Preview: Steve Inskeep Travels U.S.-Mexico Border

Originally published on Wed March 5, 2014 12:59 pm

Steve Inskeep has begun a journey along the U.S.-Mexico border — from the Gulf of Mexico to the Pacific Ocean. NPR reporters are also pursuing stories of people, goods and culture crossing the border. Over the next two weeks, the team will be sharing impressions at NPR's On The Road blog as it prepares stories to broadcast on Morning Edition and other NPR programs in late March.

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