border issues

Texas Matters: A Texas militia group takes border security into their own hands. Also on this show: Bill Powers out at University of Texas, Phil Collins on why he loves the Alamo.

Segment 1

Members of a militia group have issued an action alert and have gathered south of San Antonio for what they call Operation Secure our Border. The commander of the militia group is 37-year-old Chris Davis. This interview was recorded on July 3.

Who watches the militiamen?

Flickr user Adam Fagen (afagen) / cc

Texas Gov. Rick Perry testified before the U.S. House Homeland Security Committee, urging the president and congress to take more diplomatic efforts to stop the surge of accompanied minors coming into the state and send the National Guard to the border.   

Perry told members of the committee that the federal government has not tried to put any type of pressure on Mexico in order to stop the flow of accompanied children entering Texas every day.

David Martin Davies / TPR News

More than 50,000 minors have entered the U.S. from Central America and long-term answers to the current humanitarian crisis on the border are hard to come by. 

Much finger wagging is happening and blame is being assigned, but what are the current needs of these youth right now? What are some possible solutions?

David Martin Davies / TPR News

President Obama is requesting that Congress authorize $2 billion and special powers to deal with the surge of unaccompanied minor immigrants.

In record numbers the children are coming from Central America, crossing the Rio Grande and overwhelming the U.S. system after being apprehended at the Texas border. Most are coming from Honduras, Guatemala and El Salvador, but Honduras is the leading source country.

David Martin Davies / TPR News

Thousands of unaccompanied children are coming from Central America, crossing the Rio Grande and being apprehended at the Texas border. They are coming from Honduras, Guatemala and El Salvador – but Honduras is the main source.

As night seizes Tegucigalpa, Honduras, the streets of one of the capital city’s toughest neighborhoods, Comayagüela, are virtually deserted. Most people here know that it’s not safe for anyone to be caught out alone at night. This is where the killer gangs are notorious.

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