border issues

David Martin Davies / TPR News

Texas Matters: As Texas politicians continue to put the federal government under fire to do something about border security and the recent immigrant surge, what is happening to those who are already here or those who continue to come? Also on this show: On Juneteenth, Texas before racial equality.

Humanitarian crisis at the border

Texas Prepares Border 'Surge'

Jun 20, 2014

Gov. Rick Perry has signed a plan to spend an extra $1.3 million each week for the rest of the year to bolster efforts to patrol his state’s border with Mexico, as officials on the border report a spike in immigration, especially of unaccompanied children.

Republicans, such as state Rep. Jonathan Stickland, are cheering the idea. But Democratic state Sen. Jose Rodriguez is against what he calls further militarization of the border.

U.S. Customs and Border Patrol

Texas House Speaker Joe Straus, Gov. Rick Perry and Lt. Gov. David Dewhurst have signed off on a plan pledging $1.3 million per week for the Texas Department of Public Safety to provide border security. But some are criticizing the state for not using the money strictly for humanitarian efforts.

The recent surge of immigrants coming into Texas, among them tens of thousands of unaccompanied children, has the U.S. Border Patrol in a crisis mode.

David Martin Davies / TPR News

A group of state lawmakers concerned with the surge of unaccompanied minors making their way to Texas are petitioning Gov. Rick Perry to call a special session to address the issue. But the governor is showing no sign that he will oblige.

A group of state lawmakers have draw up some estimates of what it would cost the state to use Department of Public Safety state troopers to run 24/7 border operations: about $67 million. One of the only ways to get the money appropriated is for the governor to call a special session.

David Martin Davies / TPR News

Texas Matters: How much information should DPS and border patrol share with landowners along the Texas-Mexico border? The primary runoff for U.S. Senate in the Democratic Party is between two candidates with little statewide name recognition: One is a party establishment outsider who wants to impeach the president and the other is an entrepreneur who is originally from Lebanon.

Border surge intelligence debate