border issues

David Martin Davies / TPR News

More than 50,000 minors have entered the U.S. from Central America and long-term answers to the current humanitarian crisis on the border are hard to come by. 

Much finger wagging is happening and blame is being assigned, but what are the current needs of these youth right now? What are some possible solutions?

David Martin Davies / TPR News

President Obama is requesting that Congress authorize $2 billion and special powers to deal with the surge of unaccompanied minor immigrants.

In record numbers the children are coming from Central America, crossing the Rio Grande and overwhelming the U.S. system after being apprehended at the Texas border. Most are coming from Honduras, Guatemala and El Salvador, but Honduras is the leading source country.

David Martin Davies / TPR News

Thousands of unaccompanied children are coming from Central America, crossing the Rio Grande and being apprehended at the Texas border. They are coming from Honduras, Guatemala and El Salvador – but Honduras is the main source.

As night seizes Tegucigalpa, Honduras, the streets of one of the capital city’s toughest neighborhoods, Comayagüela, are virtually deserted. Most people here know that it’s not safe for anyone to be caught out alone at night. This is where the killer gangs are notorious.

David Martin Davies / TPR News

Texas Matters: As Texas politicians continue to put the federal government under fire to do something about border security and the recent immigrant surge, what is happening to those who are already here or those who continue to come? Also on this show: On Juneteenth, Texas before racial equality.

Humanitarian crisis at the border

Texas Prepares Border 'Surge'

Jun 20, 2014

Gov. Rick Perry has signed a plan to spend an extra $1.3 million each week for the rest of the year to bolster efforts to patrol his state’s border with Mexico, as officials on the border report a spike in immigration, especially of unaccompanied children.

Republicans, such as state Rep. Jonathan Stickland, are cheering the idea. But Democratic state Sen. Jose Rodriguez is against what he calls further militarization of the border.

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