Border Security

Norma Martinez / Texas Public Radio

This week on Fronteras:

  • Despite uncertainty surrounding the future of the border wall, security companies are getting a leg up on offering the latest technologies.
  • Wildlife officials are putting up another barrier on the border — against rabies, that is (2:18).
  • San Antonio poet laureate Jenny Browne creates a poetry exchange and art display highlighting San Antonio’s hidden history (6:48).
  • A San Antonio art exhibit gives a ‘voz’ to the Latino immigrant experience (15:05).
  • Remembering the art historian who created one of the largest collections of Spanish art in Texas (17:19).

Paul Flahive | Texas Public Radio

It's a windy morning at the Bandera Gun Club and its sprawling grass fields dotted with shooting stations on the outskirts of the tiny Texas town.

Gunshots echo along the rolling hills as more than 20 groups of men prepare their booths of technological wares for the security minded. F-350s sit with massive mast-like poles sprouting from their beds. A temporary structure holds banks of computer monitors that stream video from the 80-foot trailer-mounted tower outside.

"Can an individual border agent on the ground get this image?" Congressman Will Hurd, R-Texas, asked.



Last year, Donald Trump’s election promise to build a wall had companies working in border security riding a high.  


“With his emphasis on border security, I think the people in this industry got a little excited,” said Mike Beltrani, a vice president at Telephonics Corporation.

Ryan Poppe

Officials with the Department of Public Safety face criticism from lawmakers over the state agency’s decision to lay off 117 state troopers. But the layoffs were part of the 4 percent budget cut mandated by the Legislature.

From Texas Standard:

Immigration is at the forefront of political discourse in Texas according to the Texas Lyceum Poll, an independent opinion poll that is conducted each year to gather the opinions of Texans on major policy issues facing the state.