Border

Rio Grande Valley Adds To Border Horse Patrol

Apr 30, 2015
Courtesy: U.S. Customs And Border Protection

MISSION, Texas — Jared Barton has ridden horses since he was a toddler.

But rumbling on a Florida cattle ranch isn’t the same as the trails he’ll traverse going forward — the rough terrain of immigrant and drug smuggling trails in the Rio Grande Valley.

The Monitor reports Barton is one of the latest members of the U.S. Border Horse Patrol, a specialty group of agents that work on horseback and have been doing so since the early 1920s.

The 38-year-old agent was one of seven agents who officially completed a six-week training course to join the group in the Rio Grande Valley sector.

Terlingua, a small town in Brewster County, West Texas, near the Rio Grande, used to be a mining town. Now it's mainly a tourist destination on the way to Big Bend — but pretty soon, Terlingua might attract a different kind of tourist.

Jack Morgan / Texas Public Radio

This week on Fronteras:

--A coalition comes together to fight unprecedented natural gas pipelines in West Texas near Big Bend that would transport energy to Mexico. Residents are worried.

--A proposed Texas law pushes for an end to so called sanctuary cities.  But San Antonio police say the city is safer because immigrants can report crimes without fear of deportation.

--It’s Fiesta time in San Antonio and that means medal madness. Everyone’s having a good time collecting medals during the celebration. 

Paul Flahive / Texas Public Radio

This week on Fronteras: 

--A look at how undocumented immigrants without social security numbers pay taxes, and why the IRS doesn’t disclose their identities.

--A legal border crossing in Texas stimulates economies and relations on both sides as it celebrates the second anniversary of its opening.

--Mexican teachers experience Houston classrooms in an international, cultural exchange program.

--A unique protest in support of an arrested Cuban artist brings museums together in solidarity.

Doualy Xaykaothao / KERA

-- It’s been more than four years since President Obama signed the Affordable Care Act. More than 11 million people have signed up for health insurance, but there are still Latinos in Texas who are uninsured.

-- In New Mexico, another healthcare dilemma — a behavioral health provider will end its programs just two years after opening, leaving many criminal offenders without services.

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