Border

In his memoir “The Line Becomes a River: Dispatches from the Border,” Francisco Cantú uses a writing technique that might strike readers as unusual.

When he is writing dialogue, he omits quotation marks.

Cantú said quotation marks pull us away from the action on the page.

BRANDON QUESTER / INEWSOURCE

This week on Fronteras:

  • “Promotoras” initiative to help some San Antonio families on the west side reduce incidents of child abuse.
  • New Mexico aims to get more students of color into nursing programs (8:19).
  • A modern day vigilante stands guard on his property along the U.S./Mexico border (12:08).
  • A Dallas artist takes a whack at gentrification with a Latin party favor (16:14).


The U.S./Mexico border has been called “a leaking wound” by U.S. Poet Laureate Juan Felipe Herrera. In South Texas, that wound bleeds immigrants, drugs and violence. 

Author Stephanie Elizondo Griest spent a decade looking at all aspects of the border – religion, drugs, immigration -- and not just in her native South Texas, but all along the U.S./Canadian border. And despite being separated by 2,000 miles, Elizondo Griest found that the northern and southern borderlands have more in common than not. 

TPR's Norma Martinez had a chance to talk to the author about her latest book, “All the Agents and Saints: Dispatches from the U.S. Borderlands.”


David Martin Davies / Texas Public Radio

DEL RIO -- Del Rio was among a number of communities on both sides of the U.S.- Mexico border that held weekend rallies to oppose the Trump administration’s wall. A bipartisan group of officials on Saturday joined residents in showing their opposition to a wall.

The White House is celebrating some encouraging numbers this week. Factory jobs are up. Illegal border crossings are down.

The new administration is claiming credit on both fronts, although much of the change so far is psychological.

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