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Oil Town Roadways Are More Dangerous Than Ever

Jul 15, 2015

 

From the Texas Standard.

Improvements and enforcement aren't coming fast enough.

If you live near the Eagle Ford Shale you may have heard an ad from the Texas Department of Transportation warning drivers in the area to be extra cautious on the roadways.

It’s part of a campaign called "Be Safe, Drive Smart." Roadways aren’t like they used to be. Before the shale oil boom, the 26 counties that make up the Eagle Ford were small, bucolic places – country roads, few cars.

Now, not so much.

If you judged an invention by early media reviews of its patent, then Zodiac Seats France's "Economy Class Cabin Hexagon" seating pattern is dead on arrival.

Just a few headlines:

"Hey Look the Most Nightmarish Idea for Plane Seating Ever" (Wired)

"'Economy Class Cabin Hexagon' is every flyer's worst nightmare" (Fortune)

Evelynn Bailey / COSA

The City of San Antonio expects a $40 million dollar boost to the local economy from its largest conference ever.

The Convention and Visitors Bureau is expecting 65,000 international guests for the 10-day Seventh-day Adventist General Conference at the Alamodome.

“The Seventh-day Adventist Conference we actually booked almost ten years ago," the bureau's Cassandra Matej said, adding that this conference, as large as three Alamo Bowls, has to book early because there are just a handful cities in the country with facilities large enough.

Julie Hamp, Toyota Motor Corp.'s first senior female executive who was appointed head of public relations just weeks ago, has resigned after her arrest for allegedly importing the prescription painkiller oxycodone in violation of the country's narcotics laws.

The early 1970s were a turbulent time for a little startup called Southwest Airlines.

The company had a tiny fleet of just four airplanes that flew to three destinations — all of which were in Texas. But by 1972, Southwest had already posted a net loss of $1.6 million, and the company was forced to sell one of its planes.

"They were not yet a year old. They were consistently losing money. They were constantly scrambling to see what they could do to save cost or boost revenues," says Terry Maxon, the aviation reporter at The Dallas Morning News.

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