cancer

A proposal to simplify cervical cancer screening could end up missing some cancers, researchers and patient advocates say. And that could be especially true for minority women.

Latina and black women already have the highest rates of cervical cancer in the U.S., and more than half of women with the disease were not screened in the five years before their diagnosis, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Johnny Reyna, MD

San Antonio urologist Johnny Reyna, MD, talks about about what men and the women who love them need to know about a sometimes stealthy disease: prostate cancer.

Wendy Rigby / Texas Public Radio

A new, more accurate, test for lung cancer is being developed in San Antonio. It’s a screening that could help save the lives of thousands of people who are often diagnosed too late to survive the disease.

Wendy Rigby / Texas Public Radio

The key to finding a better way to treat a deadly form of childhood cancer may lie in a tiny fish. An unlikely animal model at UT Health San Antonio is helping scientists figure out how to tackle muscle tumors.

Eric Ward (CC BY-SA 2.0) / Flickr http://bit.ly/2ufQOOI

Almost 3 million children in the United States have a parent who is living with or has survived cancer.

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