cancer treatment

Science & Technology
1:59 pm
Wed July 16, 2014

CTRC Researchers Looking Into Spicy Foods For Cancer Prevention

Chef Iverson Brownell prepares foods for the cooking class using spices that researchers believe may reduce the risk of recurrence of breast cancer.
Credit Eileen Pace / TPR News

Scientists are testing the theory that controlling inflammation with foods can change the chances of a recurrence of breast cancer.

Chef Iverson Brownell is surrounded by bowls with pre-measured bits of herbs and spices, ready to add them to the recipes he will teach to the ladies in his cooking class.

"Today we're doing an oatmeal cookie with a little bit of rosemary in it," Brownell said. "You can only taste it a little bit, but you still get the benefits from it. For the other workshop later today, we're doing some candied nuts with some curry on it."

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Breast Cancer Research
1:57 pm
Mon December 9, 2013

New Therapies Expected To Be Revealed At World's Largest Breast Cancer Symposium This Week

The San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium, the world’s largest breast cancer conference, gets underway on Tuesday, where more than 7,000 physicians and researchers from countries across the globe will witness groundbreaking presentations.

Breast cancer news coming out of this symposium is so rapid that organizers plan multiple press conferences for media around the world to get the stories. Often researchers will complete important research projects just before the meeting, so the findings can be presented here.

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Science & Technology
11:17 am
Fri December 6, 2013

UTHSC Research Honing In On More Effective Lymphoma Treatments

With the support of the Voelcker Fund, Dr. Ricardo Aguiar’s research team has characterized a molecule (microRNA-155) that promotes the unrestricted growth of cancer cells.
UTHSC

About 75,000 new cases of lymphoma are diagnosed in the U.S. each year, and many are fatal, but a local researcher is entering the final year of study on a project that he hopes will greatly improve lymphoma survival rates.

For four years, Dr. Ricardo Aguiar at UT Health Science Center’s School of Medicine has been working under a grant from the Voelcker Fund to develop lymphoma treatments that are more effective and less toxic.

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Science & Technology
5:05 pm
Wed July 3, 2013

Pubs Serving Up Pints And Prostate Cancer Awareness

All 16 of the Flying Saucer pubs across the country, including San Antonio, have begun a month-long fundraising for prostate cancer awareness and early detection. The money raised will go to Pints for Prostates, a nonprofit that began in 2008 by a prostate cancer survivor.

"Anytime you're dealing with something cancer-oriented, awareness and early detection is very key," said Sam Wynne, Flying Saucer’s beer director and certified cicerone -- a beer and food pairing expert.

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The Source - July 1, 2013
11:17 am
Mon July 1, 2013

The Source: Anti-Discrimination Ordinance | Prostate Cancer

City of San Antonio

In the first segment:

With the historic Supreme Court rulings favoring the gay community last week, we take a look at the San Antonio anti-discrimination ordinance proposed by District 1 Councilman Diego Bernal.  

The ordinance would update the city code to include additional protections for sexual orientation, gender identity and veteran status. Bernal joins us in the studio to talk about the ordinance.

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Science & Technology
3:52 pm
Wed June 26, 2013

Report Questions Aggressive Cancer Treatment For Men Unlikely To Die Of Prostate Cancer

Doctors at the Cancer Therapy and Research Center in San Antonio say drugs such as this one used to lower testosterone in prostate cancer patients may be unnecessary
Elizabeth Allen, UTHSC-SA

A new report in the Journal of the American Medical Association said too many men have been getting aggressive treatment that they don't need for prostate cancer. The study suggests the side effects of treatments outweigh their benefits.

The side effects of surgery and radiation treatment for prostate cancer can include sexual dysfunction and urinary problems, and now researchers say those treatments may be too radical.

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