Carver Cultural Center

Aissatou Sidime-Blanton

An exhibit is set to open soon at the Carver Cultural Center.  It opens on Independence Day and features a wide variety of works.

“It is a selection of works by African American women from around the country, but with a focus on Texas women," said Aissatou Sidime-Blanton, who is curating the exhibit.

“In fact, there are nine Texas women, including two from San Antonio,” she said.

As to what the works are about, Sidime-Blanton said the theme is a fairly loose one.

You may not have heard of the dance form called “stepping,” but don't feel bad. I didn't! Here's a description:

"A lot of people describe it as highly energetic and powerful movement. And rhythmic chants often accompany the steps as well. It’s really celebrated all around the world, but a lot of Americans don’t know about," said C. Bryan Williams about the foot-pounding, knee slapping moves that he helped bring to the fore in the group he’s created, Step Afrika.

Jamie Tanaka

The Carver Cultural Center hosts another music night at the Jo Long Theater. The band playing is called the SFJazz Collective, and as to what kind of music do they do, I asked drummer Obed Calvaire.

"Chick Corea, Stevie Wonder, John Coltrane," he said.

They also play their own original music. I asked him to describe the SFJazz Collective to someone who had never heard them.

Calvin Evans

Jasmine Guy has acted on several hit TV shows, but now she’s doing something different.

“Well I’m very excited to be coming to San Antonio for this show,” she said.

Guy is an actor, singer, and dancer and now she’s coming to the Carver Cultural Center for "Raisin’ Cane, what she described as "an odyssey of the Harlem Renaissance.”

That Harlem Renaissance was a short-lived but very noteworthy period for art in Harlem.

“1919 to 1929,” Guy said.

Ron Abrams

Today is Martin Luther King Jr.'s birthday, and the Carver Cultural Center has found an interesting way of celebrating. They’re doing so with a play called "The Mountaintop."

"'The Mountaintop' is truly a fantastic piece that takes you through what possibly the last night of Martin Luther King’s life was like," said Danielle King, president of the Renaissance Guild, "San Antonio's black theater company."

The imagined scenario has Dr. King at Memphis’s Lorraine Motel the night before he was assassinated.