Charter Schools

Flickr user Bill Selak / cc

In California schools, as of last week, teacher tenure is unconstitutional. That was the finding of a state judge who said it adversely affected poor and minority students

Eileen Pace / TPR News

Following a series of reports released by Texas State Board of Education Vice Chairman Thomas Ratliff on charter school financial accountability, a state lawmaker said he’s looking into legislation for the 2015 session that will address the issue.

According to an analysis released by Ratliff last week:

After looking into administrative pay and financial accountability, a comparison between Texas charter schools and public districts show an over 30 percent gap between the two groups as it pertains to student accountability ratings.

According to 2013 numbers taken from the Texas Education Agency’s website, 62 percent of charter schools were rated as meeting the standard, while 15 percent needed improvement. Not included that set of numbers was dropout recovery and residential treatment charters, which are rated by a different standard.

Ryan Poppe / TPR News

Using data from the Texas Education Agency’s website, State Board of Education Vice Chairman Thomas Ratliff showed how the overall spending at a majority of charter schools is over the recommended amount set by the state.   

Ratliff said the general conversation about charter schools focuses on school choice, but, he said, the financial management and accountability isn’t something that’s often addressed. Following his study on superintendent pay at charter schools, it was suggested that he examine overall spending.

Flickr user biologycorner (Shannan Muskopf) / cc

State Board of Education Vice Chairman Thomas Ratliff wants people to know that charter school superintendents are making more money -- at times surprisingly more money -- than their public school peers. He wants to know if the schools that are run like a business, but take state funds per student, are using those state funds wisely.