This week on Fronteras: 

Immigration-  A Texas Judge freezes President Obama’s immigration protection plan that was supposed to start this week. The Obama administration says it will appeal but 26 states are fighting it. We’ll examine who’s against it and which immigrants are affected and how.  At the Mexican Consulate in Dallas, residents affected by the hold say they’re worried.

Children in Detention-  Attorneys claim immigrant children held in detention centers are not getting basic protections.

Mentally Ill Inmates-  In New Mexico, a look at efforts to help mentally ill inmates find the treatment they need when they get out of prison.  One mother tried to get help for her son, but it came too late.

We talk we the director of CineFestival, the nation’s longest running Chicano film festival.

A noteworthy local film festival will soon kick into high gear. I spoke to its director, San Antonian Jim Mendiola.

“This is the 37th Annual Latino Film Festival—it’s the longest running one in the United States. We’re going to be running for eight days."

Several films are screened each night of CineFestival.

"We’ve got about 35 films this year from the US and Mexico. Documentaries, narrative films and short films.”

I asked  "Are there any nights you’d describe as just must-come nights?"

At 36 years old, CineFestival is the longest-running Latino film festival in the country. Beginning last Sunday, the celebration lasts until Saturday, March 1, and provides and important venue for minority filmmakers.

The Guadalupe Cultural Arts Center hosts filmmakers and actors from across the country, showing their work each night this week with accompanying panel discussions.

Guadalupe Cultural Arts Center

CineFestival is based out of the Guadalupe Cultural Arts Center and began last week, running through Saturday.

"It’s been going for 36 years, so it’s the longest and original Latino film festival" said CineFestival Director Jim Mendiola. "First, it’s the only place in town you’ll see the latest and best independent Latino films and narratives and documentaries in one place. And it’s actually a place where you can actually meet the filmmakers because pretty much every major film that we show we bring the filmmakers in, so there’s a Q&A session afterwards."

Cristina Esquivel / Fronteras

Many of the people in the U.S. illegally actually came legally on a temporary visa, but then never went home. What authorities are doing to combat high crime rates on the Navajo Nation. A preview of a documentary that profiles a Tijuaana actor who also makes money as an immigrant smuggler. Finally, an interview with actor Lou Diamond Phillips about his latest film, "Filly Brown," and his career.