civil rights

When it comes to the list of Texans who were warriors for civil rights, the name Homer Thornberry may not likely be a name that many will conjure up.  But without his name that list would be lacking.

On Friday Texas and 12 other states asked a federal judge to block the Obama administration’s order to school districts to allow transgender students to use the bathroom of their choice.

The Obama administration order followed a Justice Department lawsuit against North Carolina which passed a law requiring people in the state to use only the public bathroom that matched their gender at birth.

On December 1, 1955, Rosa Parks refused to give up her seat to a white passenger on bus in Montgomery, Ala. — and changed the course of history.

Her action sparked the Montgomery Bus Boycott, which would eventually lead to the end of legally segregated public transportation.

And for many Americans, Parks is the civil rights icon they love to love: the unassuming seamstress who, supposedly, just got tired one day and unwittingly launched the modern civil rights movement.

After World War II, Mexican American veterans returned home to lead the struggle for civil rights.

Many of their stories have been recorded by the Voces Oral History Project founded and directed by Maggie Rivas-Rodriguez at the University of Texas at Austin School of Journalism.

In her new book “Texas Mexican Americans and Post War Civil Rights Rivas Rodriguez tells the stories of three lesser known battles in Mexican American civil rights in Texas.

Updated at 1:15 p.m. ET

Julian Bond, a key civil rights activist and anti-war campaigner who helped found the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee and later served for years as the chairman of the NAACP, has died at age 75.

The Southern Poverty Law Center, where Bond served as president in the 1970s, announced his death in a statement on Sunday. The SPLC said Bond died Saturday evening in Fort Walton Beach, Fla.

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