civil rights

Note to our readers: This report contains some strong racial language.

This month Selma, Ala., will mark the 50th anniversary of "Bloody Sunday." That's the day police beat demonstrators attempting to march to Montgomery in support of voting rights. Some of the most iconic images of that day were captured by a white photographer — the late Spider Martin.

From what people remember, he fell like a tree. Malcolm X — all 6 feet, 4 inches of him — had taken a shotgun blast to the chest and a grouping of smaller-caliber bullets to the torso while onstage at the Audubon Ballroom in Washington Heights on Feb. 21, 1965. After a ghastly moment of stasis, he careened backward. His head hit the floor with a crack.

Ilyasah Shabazz is Malcolm X’s daughter and co-author of a new young adult novel based on her father’s teen years.

X: A Novel” focuses on when Malcolm X, then known as Malcolm Little, dropped out of school after the death of his father and started using drugs and breaking into houses.

That behavior eventually led to his imprisonment, which is where he came into contact with Islam.

Did The Movie 'Selma' Get LBJ Wrong?

Jan 7, 2015

Some historians say the new film “Selma” paints President Lyndon Johnson in an unfair light with regard to his civil rights record. The film depicts him as lagging behind on voting rights for African Americans.

Two major stories have dominated the news this summer: the police shooting of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri, and the clash between Israel and the Palestinians in Gaza.

While both stories have settled into an uneasy peace, San Antonio-based poet Naomi Shihab Nye has a unique perspective having grown up in both places. She offers this commentary.

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