Civil War

Week of October 19 - October 25
3:49 pm
Fri October 24, 2014

This Week in the Civil War - #947

  The upcoming presidential election weighed heavily on Abraham Lincoln’s mind..  On Wednesday, October 19, 1864 to a delegation of Marylanders, Lincoln noted, “I am struggling to maintain government, not to overthrow it.  I am struggling to prevent others from overthrowing it.”  He directed his remarks at his Democratic opponent, George McClellan, who Lincoln feared would end the war if elected.  On the 24th of October Lincoln also told a group of Union soldiers, “While others differ with the Administration, and, perhaps, honestly, the soldiers generally have sustained it; they have not on

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Week of October 19 - October 25
3:49 pm
Thu October 23, 2014

This Week in the Civil War - #946

  Just south of present day Kansas City, at Westport, Missouri, on Sunday, October 23, 1864, Sterling Price’s Confederates attacked, with the intention of defeating the Federal forces in front of him and then turning on and defeating Pleasonton’s Federals behind him.  After two hours of desperate fighting Confederates commanded by Shelby pushed the opposing Union forces across Brush Creek; however, Federal troops commanded by Curtis counterattacked back across Brush Creek just as Union forces under Pleasonton attacked the Confederate rear guard.  By the early afternoon Price was forced to w

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Week of October 19 - October 25
3:49 pm
Wed October 22, 2014

This Week in the Civil War - #945

  In Missouri, Sterling Price’s Confederate led invasion of the state was not the all-encompassing success that either the Confederate War Department or Price himself had envisioned.  He has not recruited the number of sympathizers he had initially anticipated, and Union forces had moved quickly to pen his Confederates between the Missouri River on his right, Union forces on his left, front, and rear.  Price had partially disrupted Union supply lines into the state, prevented Union troops from being diverted against Nashville, Tennessee, and caused a great deal of local distress among Misso

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Week of October 19 - October 25
3:49 pm
Tue October 21, 2014

This Week in the Civil War - #944

  On Wednesday, October 19, 1864 the  northernmost land battle of the American Civil War occurred at St. Albans, Vermont, when Confederate raiders from St. John’s, Canada crossed the border with the intent of robbing banks.  Over a number of days, twenty-one Confederates led by Lieutenant Bennett Young made their way to St.

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The Race Card Project: Six-Word Essays
3:59 am
Tue October 21, 2014

Six Words: 'Must We Forget Our Confederate Ancestors?'

Waverly Adcock, a sergeant and founder of the West Augusta Guard, prepares his company for inspection and battle at a Civil War re-enactment in Virginia. Sara Smith, whose great-great-grandfather was wounded at the Battle of Gettysburg, holds the Confederate battle flag.
Courtesy of Jesse Dukes

Originally published on Tue October 21, 2014 7:55 am

NPR continues a series of conversations from The Race Card Project, where thousands of people have submitted their thoughts on race and cultural identity in six words.

Jesse Dukes does not have Confederate ancestors. But in the time he has spent writing about Civil War re-enactors, he has met many who say they do.

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Week of October 19 - October 25
3:49 pm
Mon October 20, 2014

This Week in the Civil War - #943

  After being on the defensive in the Shenandoah Valley for the better part of two weeks, on Wednesday, October 19, 1864, Jubal Early’s Confederates struck the Eighteenth and Nineteenth Corps of Sheridan’s army at Cedar Creek, Virginia  Attacking in an early morning fog, the Confederates initially overran Union camps and defensive positions, taking many prisoners, artillery, trains, and equipment.  The Union Sixth Corps assumed defensive positions near Middletown, and when Sheridan arrived from Winchester, led a counter assault against Early which drove the Confederates from the field with

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Week of October 12 - October 18
3:49 pm
Fri October 17, 2014

This Week in the Civil War - #942

  In Missouri General Sterling Price’s invading Confederates confidently continued to move across the state, with Price boldly issuing a public plea for Missourians to help him drive out all Federal forces and redeem the state.  On Saturday, October 15, 1864 Price’s Confederates successfully attacked Sedalia, stampeding a unit of local, home guard and forcing Union troops to surrender.  After seizing Ridgely, Missouri on the following day, Price’s Confederates approached Lexington, in the northwestern quadrant of the state.  With fighting increasing both at his front and in his rear, the Co

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Week of October 12 - October 18
3:49 pm
Thu October 16, 2014

This Week in the Civil War - #941

  By Wednesday, October 13, 1864 William Tecumseh Sherman’s Union forces in Georgia continued to skirmish with Hood’s Confederates.  Sherman’s troops occupied Reseca, Georgia on the 12th, only to see Hood’s Confederates temporarily seize the important railroad line extending north from Reseca to Tunnel Hill.  Yet by October 16 Hood opted to relocate his army to the southwest into northern Alabama, thus effectively ending his army’s ability to harass Sherman’s Chattanooga to Atlanta supply line.  Grievous as that was to the Confederacy, things would soon seem brighter for the South.  General

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Week of October 12 - October 18
3:49 pm
Wed October 15, 2014

This Week in the Civil War - #940

  On Wednesday, October 12, 1864 Chief Justice of the United States Supreme Court Roger B. Taney of Maryland died in Washington, D.

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Week of October 12 - October 18
3:49 pm
Tue October 14, 2014

This Week in the Civil War - #939

  Writing after the Civil War, Confederate Geneeral John S. Mosby reminisced about the activities of his partisan, Confederate raiders, noting “ As we operated in Sheridan’s rear, the railroad that brought his supplies was his weak point and consequently our favorite object of attack.”  In early October 1864 Mosby’s men discovered an unguarded approach to the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad near Kearneysville, west of Harper’s Ferry, Virginia.  In the pre-dawn hours of Thursday, October 13, 1864 Mosby’s command struck, taking up a section of the track and derailing a passenger train.  Two U.S.

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