Civil War

The Schreiner University Department of History is honoring the sesquicentennial of the American Civil War with a series of short vignettes, focusing on events from 1861 through 1865.  The Civil War was the most destructive conflict in American history, but it was also one of our most defining moments as a people and as a nation.

This Week in the Civil War - #1099

May 26, 2015

  At sea, the C.S.S.

This Week in the Civil War - #1098

May 25, 2015

  On Friday, June 23, 1865 at Doaksville in the Indian Territory Confederate General Stand Watie surrendered his Indian battalion of Cherokee, Creek, Seminole, and Osage to units of the Union army.  His surrender represented the last formal submission of any significant body of Confederate troops.  Afterwards, Watie led a Cherokee delegation to Washington to sue for peace, hoping to have tribal divisions recognized. The U.S.

This Week in the Civil War - #1097

May 22, 2015

  Given the success of Union forces in the field, on Monday, May 29, 1865 by presidential proclamation Andrew Johnson granted amnesty and pardons, with only a few exceptions, to all who directly or indirectly participated in the “existing rebellion.” All property rights were to be restored, except in the case of slavery and other special cases.  A simply oath of allegiance to the Constitution and to federal law was all that was required.  Such an oath for all was opposed by the Radical Republicans, who desired that only those who had never directly or indirectly supported the Confederacy be

This Week in the Civil War - #1096

May 21, 2015

  On Friday, May 26, 1865 at New Orleans Confederate General Simon Buckner, acting for General E. Kirby Smith of the Confederate Trans-Mississippi Department, negotiated with Union General Peter Osterhaus, who represented General E.R.S.

This Week in the Civil War - #1096

May 21, 2015

  On Friday, May 26, 1865 at New Orleans Confederate General Simon Buckner, acting for General E. Kirby Smith of the Confederate Trans-Mississippi Department, negotiated with Union General Peter Osterhaus, who represented General E.R.S.

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