Classical

Texas Public Radio Classical Music blog and other stories.

Roy Cox Photography

For thousands of years, cultures and civilizations have incorporated myth into their way of understanding life. Myths explain natural phenomena, teach morals, and symbolize spiritual truths; they chart the path of heroes and help to provide meaning for our own personal journey. Each generation of artists create their own renditions, and the Chamber Orchestra of San Antonio shared some by Gluck, Beethoven, and Mozart at their season finale this month (May 13) at the Tobin Center’s Carlos Alvarez Studio Theatre.

How is this for a first day on the job: Maurice Murphy, the London Symphony Orchestra (LSO)'s late principal trumpet player, spent his very first day with the orchestra recording Star Wars' iconic opening theme, with its incredible brass fanfare — and Murphy leading the trumpets.

Flickr: Nicolas Henderson/texasbackroads

As far back as the 1880s, there have been reports of mysterious glowing orbs dancing just above the horizon in far west Texas, just outside the town of Marfa. Explanations of the phenomena have ranged from campfires, to ball lightning, to automobile headlights. Regardless of their origin, the Marfa lights have inspired countless travelers, artists and writers, and now you can add a classical composer to that list.

On Friday, May 12 at the Tobin Center, Sebastian Lang-Lessing and the San Antonio Symphony held an exciting soirée de musique française with the famed mezzo-soprano Susan Graham as their honored guest.

Biography.com

Unlike Jerome Kern and Harold Arlen, who wrote their songs with numerous collaborative lyricists, and not at all like Irving Berlin and Cole Porter, who preferred doing it all themselves, writing both the music and the words, Richard Rodgers was most comfortable, and most successful, when in partnership with another. Over the course of his long and storied career in musical theater and beyond, Rodgers enjoyed two important partnerships.

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