Classical

Texas Public Radio Classical Music blog and other stories.

Why is classical music so hard to enjoy on streaming services? In one word, it's metadata. Metadata is the information that coexists with every digital music file: each and every piece of information about a selection of music that a listener might find useful to know, and what makes the information in one file discernible from the next. In the case of classical music, relevant and important metadata includes the name of the piece of music, the composer, the album it's from, the performers, the label that released the recording and the year it was recorded.

Margaret Juntwait was the mellifluous voice of the Metropolitan Opera's Saturday live radio broadcasts. She was also a longtime host at NPR member station WNYC in New York. Juntwait died Wednesday at age 58 of complications from ovarian cancer. The Met and WNYC have each offered tributes.

Phil Houseal

Luckenbach, the tiny Texas town of lore and song, is also a town of unexpected music. Luckenbach was first made internationally famous by the Waylon Jennings song, but there's a little more to the town's musical texture. I spoke to Theresa Britt from  nearby Fredericksburg.

"When I moved to Fredericksburg in 2010 I had a bunch of community members request that there be some sort of group for strings in the community, and Fredericksburg’s got kind of a reputation for liking the arts."

Wikimedia Commons

Drawing on letters, oral histories and interviews, Irina Baronova’s daughter, actress Victoria Tennant, warmly recounts her mother’s dramatic life, from her earliest aspirations, to her family’s flight from Russia, to her legendary performances in Paris. At the age of thirteen, Baronova became a star, chosen by the legendary George Balanchine to join the Ballets Russes, where she danced the lead in Swan Lake.

Nathan Cone

“The little movie with the million dollar soundtrack” is how violist and film director Matt Diekman describes his short film Upon The Awful Tree, an original story inspired by an old hymn, the director’s love of Sergio Leone, and an encounter with absinthe prepared by a fellow musician. UTSA professor Matt Dunne wrote the film’s score, which was performed by several San Antonio-area musicians, including members of the San Antonio Symphony.

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