Classical

Texas Public Radio Classical Music blog and other stories.

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For musicians and patrons of the San Antonio Symphony, the last few weeks have seen a dramatic turn of events as troubling management and union contract negotiations raised many questions about the symphony's future. 

There are times when we can connect — surprisingly deeply — with a stranger, and then never see them again. A missed connection. A while ago, we asked you to call in with your "missed connections" stories, and let us help you find that person.

Greta Pane called in about an encounter she had through the wall of a piano practice room almost 20 years ago.

San Antonio Symphony

The saga of the San Antonio Symphony continues, this time with a far more positive development for classical music fans. Violinist Craig Sorgi said Saturday the dramatic news came from Symphony Society of San Antonio, the board managing the symphony, shortly before concert time on Friday night.


Today our colleague Robert Siegel is retiring after four decades at NPR. He's covered everything from peace movements in East and West Germany to the Republican revolution of the 104th Congress, the mentally ill homeless and the 2008 earthquake in Sichuan Province, China.

Over his 30-year tenure as host of All Things Considered, Robert has also chased one of his lifelong passions — classical music. He's interviewed dozens of today's most compelling musicians.

KLRN

UPDATE, Friday evening: The Symphony Society of San Antonio voted on Friday afternoon to continue the current performance season in an abbreviated format. This is a developing story and will be updated.

 

Original story continues below.

 

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A Wednesday night meeting of the board running the San Antonio Symphony and the musicians' union ended with the suspension of the remaining performance season, effective Sunday.

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