Texas Public Radio Classical Music blog and other stories.

Imagine you're a teenager in Beijing in the 1960s and '70s, during the Cultural Revolution. Everything that's deemed Western and bourgeois is banned — so listening to a 78 rpm recording of Beethoven's Fifth Symphony, powerfully transformative as it might be, is off limits.

Albany Records

Every now and then I drop a new classical release in the player and find myself instantly delighted by new music.


I can think of many reasons to see “Florence Foster Jenkins,” the new biographical comedy starring Meryl Streep as the titular socialite who fancied herself an operatic soprano, even though she couldn’t carry a tune. But after listening to the soundtrack to the film, I cannot think of any reason to revisit it a second time.

Leo Flesher

The San Antonio Symphony launches a new initiative to reach young musicians.  It's called the High School Residency Program, and it takes musicians from the symphony and has them mentor students from two local high schools.

Yesterday in New York, something very big happened outside Lincoln Center: One thousand people gathered to sing a new piece by Pulitzer Prize-winning composer David Lang. Entitled the public domain, it was a celebration of the 50th anniversary of the Mostly Mozart festival.