Congress

Survey: Nearly 9 In 10 US Adults Now Have Health Insurance

Apr 13, 2015
Ryan Poppe

WASHINGTON — Underlining a change across the nation, nearly 9 out of 10 adults now say they have health insurance, according to an extensive survey released Monday. As recently as 2013, slightly more than 8 out of 10 had coverage.

Whether the new number from the Gallup-Healthways Well-Being Index turns out to be a high-water mark for President Barack Obama’s health care law, or a milestone on the path toward his goal of getting virtually all U.S. residents covered, remains to be seen.

The law’s future is still up in the air, and will turn on factors ranging from an upcoming Supreme Court decision on consumer subsidies to actions by Republican leaders in states opposed to Medicaid expansion.

The Gallup-Healthways survey found that the share of adults who lack insurance dropped to 11.9 percent for the first three months of this year, the lowest level since that survey began its tracking in 2008.

Shelley Kofler / KERA News

WASHINGTON — Sen. Ted Cruz said Tuesday he is signing up his family for health care coverage through the Affordable Care Act, a law the Republican presidential candidate has vowed to repeal should he win the White House.

Cruz formally launched his presidential campaign on Monday, and his wife, Heidi Cruz, began an unpaid leave of absence from her job as a managing director in the Houston office of Goldman Sachs. That meant the family would soon lose access to health insurance through Mrs. Cruz’s job, triggering a need for the Cruz family to find a new policy.

Joaquín Castro at DNC
Ryan Loyd / TPR News

After a punishing mid-term election Congressional Democrats are taking stock of what is and isn't possible this year.

San Antonio Congressman Joaquin Castro joined us in-studio to address the issues he felt passionately about and to describe the demeanor of the new Congress.

With a legislative branch increasingly vocal and active in the realm of foreign policy, the Congress Castro described is decidedly feisty.

In A Bind, Republicans Offer Vote On Homeland Security Bill

Feb 24, 2015
Wikimedia Commons

WASHINGTON  — A partial agency shutdown looming, Senate Republicans offered Tuesday to permit a vote on Homeland Security funding legislation stripped of immigration provisions backed by conservatives but strongly opposed by President Barack Obama and fellow Democrats.

“We could have that vote very quickly,” Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., said as his party struggled to escape a political predicament of their own making involving an agency with major anti-terrorism responsibilities.

Flickr user SalFalko / cc

While comprehensive immigration reform continues to go fallow, millions already in the country and even more outside the U.S. hope to become citizens. 

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