CPS Energy

Ryan Loyd / TPR News

The smartest minds are in town energized about new technology and the changing world of energy production and consumption.

This year's DistribuTech conference is in San Antonio and is helping change the future of the energy industry.

Inside the Henry B. Gonzalez Convention Center, leaders from the world's largest energy companies are busy talking about the latest and greatest in power transmission. The buzz is overwhelming, but really what It's really all about is how energy companies are updating their systems to better serve customers.

Flickr user: Jerod Tarbell / cc

In the first segment:

In never-before-seen footage  on the streets of North Korea and in the secretive prison camps, a new Frontline documentary airing tomorrow night takes viewers inside the most clandestine country in the world. What is it like living under the volatile and mysterious Kim Jong-Un?

Joey Palacios / TPR News

A new solar farm on the far South Side of San Antonio is now generating electricity for CPS energy.

Just south of loop 410  on Blue Wing Road is a newly built solar farm called Alamo 1. At 453 acres it’s the size 300 foot ball field and can generate enough energy to power 6,600 homes. It’s 167,00 solar panels went online last week, generating 40 megawatts - it’s the first phase of what will be a 400 megawatt project.

The Danish Wind Industry Association (Flickr user: danishwindindustryassociation) / cc

In the first segment:

As CPS Energy closes down the Deely coal power plant and ponders whether a new gas or nuclear plant is the solution, a big conference is landing in town next week pushing solar, wind and other renewables: The 2013 Texas Renewables Conference.

CPS Energy

The San Antonio City Council approved CPS Energy's proposed rate increase of 4.25 percent. With support from a majority of the city council, the average CPS Energy customer will be paying $4.68 more on their monthly bill.

The utility initially asked for a 4.75 percent increase, but later lowered it after concerns surfaced over the utility's employee incentive program.

CEO Doyle Beneby told the city council he wants to reduce the program even more, with a recommendation of cutting the incentive program's budget by half in 2015 and 2016.

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