CPS Energy

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In the first segment:

As CPS Energy closes down the Deely coal power plant and ponders whether a new gas or nuclear plant is the solution, a big conference is landing in town next week pushing solar, wind and other renewables: The 2013 Texas Renewables Conference.

CPS Energy

The San Antonio City Council approved CPS Energy's proposed rate increase of 4.25 percent. With support from a majority of the city council, the average CPS Energy customer will be paying $4.68 more on their monthly bill.

The utility initially asked for a 4.75 percent increase, but later lowered it after concerns surfaced over the utility's employee incentive program.

CEO Doyle Beneby told the city council he wants to reduce the program even more, with a recommendation of cutting the incentive program's budget by half in 2015 and 2016.

CPS Energy

San Antonio city staffers have recommended the CPS Energy rate increase of 4.25 percent, which would add $4.68 to the average customer's bill.

The city's chief financial officer told the city council that CPS Energy leaders have worked hard to make their rate request as low as possible.

Ben Gorzell said the city worked closely with the utility and found the budget process this time around had improved significantly over 2010. Gorzell made four recommendations to the utility.

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The San Antonio Water System has announced its proposed rate increase for customers and leaders with the utility will soon approach the city council members for their consideration.

SAWS wants an increase of 5.1 percent -- about $2.59 to the average monthly bill -- to fund new water sources and address wastewater compliance initiatives that the Environmental Protection Agency require.

SAWS Facebook

The San Antonio City Council has begun reviewing potential rate increases from the San Antonio Water System and CPS Energy, a process that will continue until November.

The first of the meetings started Wednesday, when CPS President and CEO Doyle Beneby provided the council an overview of the utility's 4.75 percent proposed increase, which would add $5.19 to the average gas and electric bill each month.

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