cyber security

Paul Flahive

Among the whir of computer fans, students are working to hold off a cyber attack that could derail their e-commerce business.

"Can someone SSH in and check if this is live?" asks Sarah Cuhna, a first year masters degree student at Brigham Young University.

Cuhna and seven other students on Team Autolock are furiously relaying information to one another, updating systems on their network, as the team is bombarded by hackers.  

"You're in? Fixed it!" Cuhna yells while high-fiving another student. 

Conor | https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Backlit_keyboard.jpg

Americans know less about cyber security than about other technical issues according to a recent Pew Research Center poll.

President Obama has promised to take action in response to findings by U.S. intelligence agencies that Russia hacked computers at the Democratic National Committee and other Democratic political groups. And one of Donald Trump's first big decisions as president may be whether to continue down the chosen path.

Lawmakers are studying whether state agencies are doing enough to keep online “Hack-ta-vists” and other cyber criminals from accessing and stealing personal information.  But state officials say while there are advances in technology, experts in the industry are not as readily available to state agencies.

Virginia Alvino / Texas Public Radio News

Researchers at The University of Texas at San Antonio are slated to receive more than $10 million to help the federal government establish cyber-security standards.

Dr. Gregory White is the Director for the Center for Infrastructure Assurance and Security at UTSA. He says his center was tasked with the job by the Department of Homeland Security. The group at UTSA will lead a team of other security companies to establish voluntary standards for information sharing.

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