Democratic National Convention

At the end of the grueling 2008 primary fight, Hillary Clinton gathered supporters in Washington, D.C., and delivered perhaps the most memorable line of her whole campaign.

"Although we weren't able to shatter that highest, hardest glass ceiling this time, thanks to you, it's got about 18 million cracks in it," Clinton said to roaring applause.

It's a line, one could say, that began paving the way for her seemingly inevitable 2016 campaign.

Ryan Loyd / Texas Public Radio

The Youth Vote:

Women and middle class voters are two demographics the presidential campaigns are targeting this election, but they’re not the only ones. The youth vote is credited with playing a major role in the 2008 elections and is being looked at again as a potential x-factor.

Ryan Loyd / Texas Public Radio

In a crowded Time Warner Cable Arena, applause echoed off the walls of the place where Charlotte’s hometown teams – the Bobcats and the Checkers – play their games.

Thousands of Democrats have come together to back a Commander in Chief they say has done so much for the Latino community. They say it’s time to once again rise up and back him – to help him win this election.

Wikipedia Commons user Angr / cc

More from the Democratic National Convention from TPR's Ryan Loyd. Is Texas on the verge of being a fertile ground for Democratic candidates? The Quorum Report's Harvey Kronberg shares his thoughts on future elections in Texas. An update on the Texas juvenile justice system five years since the scandal broke at the Texas Youth Commission.

San Antonio Mayor Julián Castro
Ryan Loyd / Texas Public Radio

Mayor Castro's remarks put his own personal story about his family’s sacrifice in the spotlight, while at the same time remaining focused on a clear message that separated the Democratic party's views from those of the GOP.

Castro told the story of his late grandmother’s journey from Mexico to San Antonio nearly 100 years ago, and how she had to drop out of school to work to help take care of the family. But he also spent some time defining the differences between Barack Obama and Mitt Romney - presumably with some encouragement by the Obama campaign.