Democratic National Convention

San Antonio Mayor Julián Castro
Ryan Loyd / Texas Public Radio

Democratic National Convention - Mayor Julián Castro

Tuesday night San Antonio Mayor Julián Castro stepped into the national spotlight by delivering the keynote address at the Democratic National Convention in Charlotte, North Carolina. The prime time spot at the convention has turned Castro into a national political figure and has spurred talk that he’ll soon seek a statewide elected office. However, Texas has not elected a democrat to a statewide office since 1997.

Joaquín Castro at DNC
Ryan Poppe / TPR News

The Democratic Party released its platform that calls for higher taxes on wealthier Americans, abortion rights, and marriage equality, something that’s never been a part of the platform before.

The platform now says the Democratic Party “supports the right of all families to have equal respect, responsibilities, and protections under the law.”

Ryan Loyd / Texas Public Radio

In the shadows of the big bank buildings on College Street in Uptown Charlotte, protestors danced in the street, waved signs and played instruments.

Charlotte is known as "Wall Street South" because of its huge financial centers. Some of the hundreds of demonstrators want the money taken out of politics, some are against the war, and others want to preserve a woman’s right to choose.

This coalition, including 20-year-old Sebastian Feculak, believes elected leaders need to know what they think.

Ryan Loyd / TPR

“I’m excited and of course a little bit nervous, and I know that it’s a very important moment,” said Mayor Julián Castro, who will deliver the keynote address tonight and tell how far his family has come in his American story.  

“It’s a 'made in America' story that is so common throughout the generations, no matter where folks have come from,” said Castro.

Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa
Ryan Loyd / Texas Public Radio

Speaking at the Latino Leaders Lunch as chairman of the Democratic National Convention, Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa said he doesn’t cry much, but he did when President Barack Obama instituted deferred deportation of young Americans brought into the country by their undocumented parents.

“Because," said Villaraigosa, "these people are not only our future, they’re the best and brightest; they’re the strongest!”

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