Department of Defense

Military retirees can camp, golf, and fish at hundreds of military bases. It costs less than civilian resorts, making the bases popular vacation spots for thousands of former service members.

Photo courtesy BAMC Public Affairs

In late October, the Defense Health Agency announced a suite of 36 five-year contracts, with a cumulative $7.5 billion ceiling, for professional medical services in the Defense Department’s military treatment facilities in the 50 states, District of Columbia, Guam and Puerto Rico. Some of that money will go toward improving the military health system in San Antonio.


cdc.gov

A San Antonio research company confirms one of its Texas subsidiaries received potentially dangerous anthrax spores accidentally shipped by U.S. Department of Defense workers.  

A company spokesman says the live anthrax spores received by Signature Science in Austin, were frozen and the containers hadn’t been opened. 

Signature Science is a for-profit subsidiary of Southwest Research Institute in San Antonio. The company website says Signature Science works on a variety of government projects including those that provide “national and homeland security.”

Gillibrand2010 / Wikimedia Commons

WASHINGTON — In a scathing critique of the Defense Department’s efforts to curb sexual assaults, a U.S. senator warned Monday that the true scope of sex-related violence in the military communities is “vastly underreported” and that victims continue to struggle for justice.

Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand, D-N.Y., said in a report that the Pentagon refused to provide her with all the information she requested about sexual assaults at several major bases. The material she did receive revealed that the spouses of service members and civilian women who live or work near military facilities are especially vulnerable to being sexually assaulted.

Yet they “remain in the shadows” because neither is counted in Defense Department surveys to determine the prevalence of sexual assaults, the report said. “I don’t think the military is being honest about the problem,” Gillibrand said in an interview.

The senator said her analysis of 107 sexual assault cases found punishments that were too lenient and the word of the alleged assailant was more likely to be believed than the victim. Less than a quarter of the cases went to trial and just 11 resulted in conviction for a sex crime. Female civilians were the victims in more than half the cases, said Gillibrand, an outspoken advocate for an overhaul of the military justice system.

Courtesy www.calpurpleheart.org

AUSTIN — Dozens of survivors and relatives of soldiers who died in the 2009 Fort Hood shooting are finally getting the Purple Hearts they have felt were long overdue.

The ceremony Friday will take place at the sprawling Texas military post where an Army psychiatrist opened fire on dozens of unarmed soldiers and killed 13 people. Gunman Nidal Hasan was convicted in 2013 and sentenced to death.

Military officials had denied Purple Hearts to victims because they classified the attack as workplace violence and not an act of terrorism.

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