Department of Public Safety

The Texas Tribune

Special agents with the Department of Public Safety are being used to locate an estimated 2,800 children who have been deemed by the state as at high-risk for abuse.  The DPS began assisting Child Protective Services in their efforts following a fiery meeting at the state capitol and a legislative ultimatum.

Sundar1 / Wikimedia Commons

The Texas Department of Public Safety is considering a policy change to the state’s limited medical-marijuana law that would raise the fees for dispensaries and growers from $6,000 to $1.3-million dollars.   

At the end of 2015, the Public Safety Commission passed an initial set of rules, part of which set the rate that would be imposed on businesses wanting to become dispensaries and grow operations at $6,000.  This month, the state agency proposed raising that fee to $1.3 million dollars.

At a panel discussion hosted by the Texas Tribune Wednesday, state lawmakers sounded off on issues that are likely to come up in the 2017 legislative session—among them: border security.

Last month, the Texas Department of Public Safety requested $1.1 billion for border security over the next two years. Last budget, DPS received $800 million, and State Senator Jose Menendez isn’t sure it’s been well spent.

Epileptic Council

Members of Texas’ DPS Public Safety Commission have put off establishing the rules for the state's limited medical marijuana law passed in 2015. 

The Department’s Ren Earl Bowie asked commissioners at Thursday’s hearing to postpone any discussion and possible vote on the rules that would establish an online registry of patients, doctors and dispensaries connected to the state’s limited medical marijuana law. That law currently only includes low-THC cannabis oil that is incapable of getting a person “high.”

Texas Authorities Begin Questioning Lawmakers In Hidden Video Scandal

May 9, 2015
texasgopvote.com

AUSTIN — The Texas Department of Public Safety has quietly begun interviewing state lawmakers, asking about a conservative group that sent shockwaves through the Legislature when it said it had secretly videotaped elected officials to try to capture them in embarrassing situations.

Texas Rangers could be seen late Friday questioning representatives individually outside the House chamber; it was unclear how many had to answer questions.

Several lawmakers said they were aware that the officers were around to take statements but declined to provide details about what was asked.

Eastland Republican Rep. Jim Keffer confirmed that he had been questioned about people videotaping. He said he told investigators that he hadn’t been approached and secretly taped, as far as he knew.

Other lawmakers, including Denton Republican Rep. Myra Crownover, also confirmed that they had been interviewed.

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