deportation

Maria Sanchez is a 63-year-old widow, grandmother of three and a legal permanent resident who has lived and worked in Sonoma County, Calif., for more than 40 years.

But she has also come close to being deported. Four years ago, Sanchez was almost separated from her family here in the U.S. for a crime she committed in the late 1990s. Hers is a story that brings up one of the most volatile issues in this election season — immigration, and by extension, deportation.

Late last year, it was revealed that the Department of Homeland Security was going to step up pursuit of people with deportation orders. Arrests took place the first weekend of January; DHS has confirmed that 121 people were detained in those operations.

John Burnett / NPR

Government Raids And Deports Central American Families

Federal immigration agents have initiated a controversial roundup of Central American families who were part of the border surge that began in 2014.

They are mainly young mothers with children whose asylum claims have been rejected. The Homeland Security Department says 121 have been picked up out of more than 100,000 immigrants who crossed the border illegally.

At a shelter home in East Austin, the raids by Immigration and Customs Enforcement, or ICE, have terrified immigrants here who lost their cases and await deportation.

Los Angeles Public Library / Herald Examiner Collection

 This week on Fronteras:  

--Connecting Latinos with vital health knowledge in the community.  A look at promotoras de salud.

-- In New Mexico, toxic chemical vapors have been seeping into the air unchecked since the 90’s.  Some homeowners are worried.

--San Diego residents split over Pope Francis canonizing Spanish Missionary Junipero Serra

-- We’ll take a look back at when Mexicans, many of them naturalized Americans, were deported in huge numbers from the United States.

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