deportation

You might think that when someone is deported from the U.S., it’s a one-way trip. But most people are deported multiple times. Many are parents trying to get back to family left behind.

Reporter Liz Jones (@KUOWLiz) of KUOW looks at this “revolving door” of deportation and some of its costs — financially, and on a personal level. Her story takes place in Mexico City, where many deportees land and wonder what’s next.

Martin do Nascimento / KUT News

This week on Fronteras:

  • Border Patrol agents go through extremes on the job, ranging from extreme boredom to high-stress situations. 0:00
  • Some immigrant laborers who responded to Harvey don’t get paid.  4:05

  • Bi-partisan support in Texas for new DREAM Act legislation to protect recipients of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrival program from deportation.  5:43

  • A study on discrimination shows many Latinos weren’t encouraged to pursue higher education. 8:20

  • A  binational study of heart disease is looking at how it affects people of Mexican ancestry. 13:23


From Texas Standard:

Immigration and Customs Enforcement arrested almost 500 people in just four days of immigration raids last month alone. While that operation did not target Texas, the crackdown has many of the estimated 1.6 million unauthorized immigrants in the state feeling worried.

From Texas Standard:

The first few days of the school year are an anxious time for most kids. But there’s a group whose levels of stress and anxiety are so high that they can only be compared to those who have experienced trauma.

Silvia Zuvieta Rodriguez is one of them.

“Since I was little I always had anxiety when it came to my parents not coming home at a certain time,” she says.

From Texas Standard:

El Rancho Supermarkets are like New York's bodegas – but on steroids. The aisles are still pretty narrow but the produce is fresh and affordable. You can find authentic products from Latin America, so this place is a magnet for people like me – foreign-born.

Pages