diabetes

Undiagnosed diabetes may not be as big of a public health problem as thought.

That's the takeaway from a study published Monday in the Annals of Internal Medicine that says that some previous efforts have likely overestimated the number of people with undiagnosed diabetes because they relied on a single positive test result.

Wendy Rigby / Texas Public Radio

A new case study published in a national journal predicts that the implementation of a sweeping diabetes prevention program in San Antonio could save more than $400 million dollars in healthcare related costs over 20 years.

Diabetes is a huge problem in the Alamo City, impacting an estimated 14 percent of the population.

  

Wendy Rigby / Texas Public Radio

South Texas has more than its share of kidney disease. A high incidence of diabetes puts people at risk of renal failure. Heart procedures can threaten fragile kidney function, too. A new device is making heart repair safer for kidney patients.

Wendy Rigby / Texas Public Radio

A possible cure for diabetes is on the horizon for the millions of people who suffer from the disease. The important research is being conducted in San Antonio. The technique is designed to make the body produce insulin on its own again.

Diabetic patients have to use finger pricks to check blood sugar and insulin shots to control their glucose levels.

Elizabeth Allen / University Health System

You've probably heard about the large numbers of people in South Texas who suffer from diabetes. But what does it mean if you are diagnosed as pre-diabetes?

TPR's Bioscience Medicine reporter Wendy Rigby interviewed Curtis Triplitt, Pharm.D., a researcher at the Texas Diabetes Institute on San Antonio's West Side. This is a transcript of that interview:

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