Diego Bernal

Joey Palacios / TPR News

The newest face in the Texas House will be former San Antonio City Councilmember Diego Bernal, after he won District 123 in a special run-off election Tuesday night. Bernal will replace outgoing Rep. Mike Villarreal.

Democrat Bernal had 64 percent of the vote over Republican Nunzio Previtera, and should be comfortable with being the face of the district he represented on the San Antonio City Council. While how and when the transition to the Capitol will take place is not set in stone, he’s got a plan for once he’s in.

AUSTIN — Special runoff elections on Feb. 17 will choose a new member of the Texas Senate and new representatives for two House districts.

Gov. Greg Abbott on Friday set the election date for the last three open seats in the Texas Legislature. The biggest prize is the San Antonio Senate seat that Democrat Leticia Van de Putte has held since 1999.

Diego Bernal

Tagging is a persistent problem in San Antonio and District 1 Councilman Diego Bernal talked about how he’s trying to fight it.

“We take buildings that have been tagged significantly and we offer building owner an opportunity for a free mural,” he said.

Bernal said that their technique is pretty simple.

“We’ve got artists that we have in waiting and we get the artist and the building owner together," he said. "They come up with a concept and then we pay for the paint and scaffolding and those sorts of things.”

Ryan Loyd / TPR News

Downtown San Antonio may be changing with the construction of the first office tower built there since the late 1980s.

A plan by Frost Bank, Weston Urban and the city of San Antonio is in the works in a public-private partnership to build an "iconic" office tower catty-corner to the current Frost Bank Tower on Houston Street.

In explaining the concept, Mayor Julián Castro said Thursday it's nothing but momentum that resulted in this complex deal. City leaders say that it will be cost-neutral to the taxpayers of San Antonio.

Flickr User: Brandon Watts / cc

San Antonio is a poor city by several metrics. We have below average home ownership, above average poverty. San Antonio is also a cheap city with cost of living significantly lower than other like-sized cities. But what happens when housing prices valuations start to go up?

A study being conducted by Christine Drennon, director of urban studies at Trinity University, has had early findings coming in and the results are showing several neighborhoods with ascending property values.

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