Diego Bernal

AARON SCHRANK/TPR

Last school year, Texas State Representative Diego Bernal visited every public school in his District 123. In a recent post on the website Medium, he shared some of what he heard from teachers on those 55 school visits. Bernal told Texas Public Radio’s Aaron Schrank he hopes that document will be a policy guide for legislative colleagues on both sides of the aisle, who he says talk a lot about how to improve education.

From Texas Standard:

Along with other Texas lawmakers,  state Rep. Diego Bernal, a Democrat from San Antonio, has been getting an earful from all sides on problems with public education in Texas.

But rather than taking someone else's word for it, he did what no other lawmaker has yet to do – he visited every single school in his district, 55 in all.

 


Joey Palacios / TPR News

The newest face in the Texas House will be former San Antonio City Councilmember Diego Bernal, after he won District 123 in a special run-off election Tuesday night. Bernal will replace outgoing Rep. Mike Villarreal.

Democrat Bernal had 64 percent of the vote over Republican Nunzio Previtera, and should be comfortable with being the face of the district he represented on the San Antonio City Council. While how and when the transition to the Capitol will take place is not set in stone, he’s got a plan for once he’s in.

AUSTIN — Special runoff elections on Feb. 17 will choose a new member of the Texas Senate and new representatives for two House districts.

Gov. Greg Abbott on Friday set the election date for the last three open seats in the Texas Legislature. The biggest prize is the San Antonio Senate seat that Democrat Leticia Van de Putte has held since 1999.

Diego Bernal

Tagging is a persistent problem in San Antonio and District 1 Councilman Diego Bernal talked about how he’s trying to fight it.

“We take buildings that have been tagged significantly and we offer building owner an opportunity for a free mural,” he said.

Bernal said that their technique is pretty simple.

“We’ve got artists that we have in waiting and we get the artist and the building owner together," he said. "They come up with a concept and then we pay for the paint and scaffolding and those sorts of things.”

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