discrimination

Martin do Nascimento / KUT News

This week on Fronteras:

  • Border Patrol agents go through extremes on the job, ranging from extreme boredom to high-stress situations. 0:00
  • Some immigrant laborers who responded to Harvey don’t get paid.  4:05

  • Bi-partisan support in Texas for new DREAM Act legislation to protect recipients of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrival program from deportation.  5:43

  • A study on discrimination shows many Latinos weren’t encouraged to pursue higher education. 8:20

  • A  binational study of heart disease is looking at how it affects people of Mexican ancestry. 13:23



Valery Pozo still gets angry thinking about it. It was about a decade ago, and the immigrant communities in her hometown, Salt Lake City, were on edge because of recent immigration enforcement raids in the area. Pozo's mother, an immigrant from Peru, was on the sidelines at her son's soccer game when another parent asked whether she was "illegal."

"To me, that was clearly a racist question and a racist assumption," Pozo recalled.

But her mother saw it as a harmless comment, despite Pozo's best efforts to convince her that it was something bigger.

Groups suing Texas over its political maps are asking a federal court to block the state's current congressional boundaries ahead of the November 2018 elections.

Ferguson: One Year Later

Nov 24, 2015

One year ago tonight, an announcement came from the St. Louis County prosecutor in Ferguson Missouri. Darren Wilson, a white police officer, would not be indicted for fatally shooting an unarmed black 18-year-old named Michael Brown.

The city of Ferguson erupted. Protesters set fire to more than a dozen buildings around the city. Police officers used tear gas, smoke, armored vehicles, snipers and police dogs to quell the demonstrations, which continued for weeks.

Despite a recent loss in Houston over the city's embattled anti-discrimination ordinance, gay rights activists across the state can still claim successes in enacting protections elsewhere. There are now 10 Texas cities with populations of more than 100,000 that have some rules or legislation in place to protect residents or city employees based on sexual orientation or gender identity.

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