drought

Chris Eudaily / TPR News

Last week the San Antonio Water System trustees approved a deal to begin negotiations to pipe in 50,000 acre feet of water from the Bastrop area with the Vista Ridge Consortium.

The deal would increase the city's water supply by more than 20%. The cost per acre foot is expected to be more than twice that of Edwards Aquifer supplies and slightly more than that of the forthcoming desalinization plant.

Flickr user Judy Baxter / cc

Agriculture forecasters at Texas A&M AgriLife Extension are predicting a medium-size pecan crop for the state in 2014. Experts say this year’s production will be better than the last three, but still under capacity.

The Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service estimates farmers will produce between 50 million and 55 million pounds of pecans in 2014.

Texas A&M Forest Service

Years of drought have stretched the water supply pretty thin in Texas. Watering yards is not at the top of the priority list, but maybe when it comes to your tree it should be.

The stress being put on trees across Texas is unprecedented and leaving trees vulnerable to a number of issues.

Outbreaks of hypoxylon, a usually fatal disease affecting hardwood trees, are far above average. 

Is it time to ditch the grass and just water the tree?

Guest:

Flickr User: Brandon Watts / cc

More than 3 million people move to Texas every year and the need for new building to accommodate housing and jobs for some of those people requires more water and more infrastructure for water. 

How we pay for some of that expansion has come under fire as the San Antonio Water System (SAWS) has recommended doubling the amount of so-called impact fees on developers from $1,297 to $2,796. Impact fees are a one-time fee that pays for water and sewer infrastructure.

The city of Wichita Falls, Texas, may soon become the first in the country where half of the drinking water comes directly from wastewater.

Yes, that includes water from toilets.

The plan to recycle the water became necessary after three years of extreme drought, which has also imposed some harsh restrictions on Wichita Falls residents, says Mayor Glenn Barham.

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