DVD

Courtesy the Criterion Collection.

From the moment he set spaceships waltzing to “The Blue Danube,” it was clear Stanley Kubrick knew how to use music—and specifically, classical music—in his films. Excepting “Full Metal Jacket,” the fastidious and exacting director would use classical music throughout the rest of his career, from switched-on versions of Beethoven in “A Clockwork Orange” to abstract and terrifying music by Gyorgy Ligeti and Krzysztof Penderecki in films like “Eyes Wide Shut” and “The Shining.”

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

TERRY GROSS, HOST:

This is FRESH AIR. Our TV critic, David Bianculli, has a review of several recently released big DVD box sets. He says there are reasons to grab them now while you can.

(SOUNDBITE OF TV SHOW, "THE ED SULLIVAN SHOW")

Adopt Films

With close to 200 appearances on screen, Harry Dean Stanton is one of our best character actors, and it’s often through his quiet moments that he does great work, from a rare starring turn in Wim Wenders’ “Paris, Texas,” to a blue-collar space engineer in “Alien," to Lyle Straight, brother of Alvin Straight in David Lynch’s “The Straight Story,” to the sympathetic father of Molly Ringwald in “Pretty in Pink.”

If the road movie has a home, it's surely the United States. After all, the settling of America was itself a kind of humongous road picture — all those wagons rolling across the new continent's spectacular vastness. And with our ceaseless love of movement, we became the first people to be transported — in every sense — by the automobile. Small wonder, then, that so many famous Hollywood films, from It Happened One Night to Thelma & Louise, are all about hitting the road.

Today, the DVD of the Oscar-nominated film “Philomena” is being released. One of the special features contained on the DVD is an interview with the real Philomena Lee. Her life story of being forced to give up her son for adoption and her long search for him inspired the film.

We spoke with Philomena and her daughter Jane Libberton, who helped Philomena with her search, back when the film was in theaters, and today we revisit that conversation.

Pages