Eagle Ford Shale

UTSA Institute for Economic Development

A new study by UTSA’s Institute for Economic Development shows a rapidly-rising economy is in store for the West Texas oil and gas play.

The largest oil production in Texas has always been in the Permian Basin, but with new hydraulic fracking technologies, more of the shale plays around the state are starting to get a piece of the pie. 

Eileen Pace

As activity and income from the Eagle Ford Shale continues to grow, affected communities are studying how to manage finite resources into the future.

Local and state leaders are planning for issues that could not be fully addressed during the boom that hit the area six years ago.  

South Texas counties successfully weathered transformational changes with the Eagle Ford. It’s no secret that incomes have skyrocketed.

U.S. Energy Information Administration

More than 600 South Texas business and community leaders are meeting in San Antonio this week for the third annual Eagle Ford Shale Consortium Conference.

The communities over the Eagle Ford Shale have come a long way since the first wells were drilled in 2008 and the first few years saw growth so rapid that residents could barely keep up.

South Texas is in the midst of a massive oil boom. In just a few years, it has totally transformed once-sleepy communities along a crescent swoosh known as the Eagle Ford Shale formation and has brought unexpected prosperity — along with a host of new concerns.

Among the towns drastically changed by the drilling is Cotulla, southwest of San Antonio, about 70 miles up from the border with Mexico. The area is called brush country — flat, dry ranch land, scrubby with mesquite and parched by drought.

South Texas Environmental Education and Research

According to oil field service company Baker-Hughes, almost half of all the oil rigs in the United States, and almost 25 percent of rigs worldwide, are in the Eagle Ford Shale region, working on "tight" oil deposits. The exploration explosion has been a boon for local economies, and also reaches statewide in its scope. Unemployment in these areas has dropped to as low as 4 percent in some counties.

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