On Friday, the Labor Department announced that the economy added 280,000 jobs in May — a strong figure, and a much faster rate than economists expected.

Now imagine that in your state, job creation was nearly four times that fast.

That's what GOP presidential hopeful Rick Perry can claim for Texas during his tenure as governor. Among all of the governors running for president, he can boast the best job creation numbers.

From Texas Standard:

There are some 254 counties in Texas, and inevitably if you were to try to map the state's economic health, you'd probably find some clear winners and losers. But a new survey shows that the answers might not be what you'd expect to find.

A new survey by the Austin Business Journal mapped out data from the Texas Relative Economic Community Health Index, or TRECH, to determine the most and least fiscally sound counties in the state.

Lee Kuan Yew, the founding father of modern Singapore and one of Asia's most influential politicians, has died at age 91, according to the Singapore Prime Minister's office.

During more than a half-century as Singapore's leader, he helped turn the city-state from a sleepy British colony into an affluent and efficient trading enclave, which enjoys the world's third-highest per capita GDP.

But he was also criticized for running a one-party, authoritarian regime under which critics were muzzled and political rivals hounded.

"Hitchhacking" via Flickr

Economists don’t seem to agree on whether the plummeting price of oil could cause a recession in Texas next year.

The price per barrel has dropped to $55, about half of where it was during the first part of 2014.

Michael Feroli, the chief U.S. economist at J.P. Morgan Chase, recently told clients that Texas is “at risk of slipping into a regional recession” because of the decline in oil prices. 

However, Economist Michael Plante with the Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas, doesn’t think a recession is on the horizon.

McClatchy Newspapers

Construction firms in Texas are dodging taxes, shifting them to employees and shorting the government out of $1.2 billion, according to a new investigative report called Contract to Cheat conducted by the Ft. Worth Star-Telegram and McClatchey newspapers.

More than 37% of Texas' 800,000 construction workers are being misclassified as independent contractors instead of employees, says an investigative report.