economy

The San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium held each December has grown to represent one of the largest conferences in San Antonio. Since 1977 the meeting has grown to become the largest gathering of breast cancer experts in the world.

This year’s symposium drew more than 7,400 oncologists, nurses, researchers and breast cancer advocates from around the globe whose visit translated to more than $9 million in economic impact for the city. Add exhibitors, sponsors and staff and the number of attendees grows to 7,625. 

Joseph Thorton (Flickr user: jtjdt) / cc

It was a secret meeting that every one heard about: Big wheels from Tesla having a sit down with local leaders. The topic: The "gigafactory" that everyone wants.

Private entreaties from CPS Energy also made public, the city may pull out all the stops to land the estimated $5 billion-$6 billion deal. 

Do we really have a shot at Tesla's "gigafactory"?

Guest:

A range of business associations in Texas came together today in Austin, hoping to catch the attention of Texas lawmakers in Washington, D.C., about the topic of immigration reform.

The group, which doesn't support amnesty or a pathway to citizenship, said they are running out of their unskilled labor force.

The SABÉR Research Institute

The San Antonio Economic Outlook for 2014 that came out Friday shows more optimism than caution for the next year.

San Antonio’s employment growth is back on track following the recession, thanks to the recovery of some key local industries. More people are getting back to work in certain industries like construction, hospitality, retail, government and health services.  

Sandia Labs (Flikr User: Sandialabs)

250 years ago the world was turned upside down by the industrial revolution. Many are saying that a new industrial revolution, a robotic revolution, is already upon us.

Bill Gates of the American Enterprise Institute predicts that in 20 years there will be a completely different employment landscape in the country and that the demand for labor will be much less, especially in low-skill jobs.

"Technology, over time, will reduce the demand for jobs, particularly at the lower end of the skillset." - Bill Gates, March 13, 2014

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