Education

This summer, millions of excited 4-, 5- and 6-year-olds will be getting ready for their first real year of school. But some of them may be in for a wake-up call when that first bell rings.

If you have young kids in school, or talk with teachers of young children, you've likely heard the refrain — that something's changed in the early grades. Schools seem to be expecting more of their youngest students academically, while giving them less time to spend in self-directed and creative play.

Something's wrong in America's classrooms.

According to new data from the Education Department, black students — from kindergarten through high school — are 3.8 times more likely to be suspended than white students.

Now the really bad news.

This trend begins in preschool, where black children are already 3.6 times more likely to be suspended than white students.

Eileen Pace / Texas Public Radio

A network of new, tech-education magnet schools is coming to downtown San Antonio.

The Centers for Applied Science and Technology, or CAST, is the result of a public-private partnership between the SAISD and a consortium led by H-E-B, which donated $3.6 million dollars to get the program started.

SAISD Superintendent Pedro Martinez says a group of community, technology, and government leaders have been visiting other technology schools around the country for the last year. They're working together to plan the curriculum for the first CAST school.  

Why would she teach preschool when she could make a heck of a lot more money teaching kindergarten? It's a question I've heard over and over again reporting on education. In some places, we pay early childhood teachers less than fast-food workers, less than tree trimmers. As a country, we've acknowledged the importance of early learning and yet, when you look at what we pay those educators, it doesn't add up.

Foul Ups Prompt State to Scrap School Test Scores

Jun 10, 2016

Editor's note: This story has been updated throughout.

Fifth and eighth graders who failed STAAR exams this year won’t be held back a grade or be required to retest later this month, Education Commissioner Mike Morath announced late Friday, citing “ongoing reporting issues” with the state’s new testing vendor.

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