Education

Joey Palacios / Te

The South San ISD Board will discuss the Texas Education Agency’s appointment of a conservator at a special board meeting on Tuesday.  At least one board member and a San Antonio city council member are happy to see the TEA step in.

The overseer appointed by the TEA will have control over much of the governing operations of the South San school board.  For board member Stacey Estrada, that’s a welcome addition. “I’m actually very excited about it. I think that this is going to be a big plus for our district,” Estrada said.

The state has stripped board members and administrators in the South San Antonio Independent School District of some significant authority.

Friday, Texas Education Commissioner Mike Morath, appointed a conservator to oversee financial management and governance decisions at the district.

“This intervention is necessary,” Morath wrote, “to prevent substantial or imminent harm to the welfare of the district’s students or to the public interest.”

The conservator’s role will include overseeing financial management and governance of the district.

Robert Runyon Photograph Collection, The Dolph Briscoe Center for American History, The University of Texas at Austin

Texas is a state proud of its history. But, like any history, the Lone Star State’s has largely been written by its victors.

One group of scholars is trying to change that. They say the mythology and heroism of the Texas Rangers isn’t the whole story.

Many Mexicans fled north of the border during the Mexican revolution, only to be met with discrimination and indiscriminate violence in the U.S. Rangers labeled Mexicans “bandits” and took to indiscriminately killing hundreds, if not thousands. They killed with impunity, and without fear of legal consequences.

Acting U.S. Education Secretary John B. King Jr. wants states and districts to focus on streamlined, higher-quality tests in a broader effort to win back some classroom time.

And here's the kicker: The feds will actually pay for (some of) the transition.

Miguel Gutierrez Jr. / KUT News

    

Student Goes To Jail, Finds Career

Most schools tell students to stay out of jail, but Akins High School in South Austin sends some of its students there once a week to learn how to become correctional officers.  The program’s part of the school’s criminal justice curriculum, and allows students a hands-on look at life in the working world of a prison.  KUT’s Kate McGee spent a day with one student in the program.

Here's the story. 

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