Education

There’s room for improvement for Texas public school children according to Texas Education Commissioner Mike Morath. He was in Dallas on Wednesday talking about the state of education in Texas. Morath said the state needs to do more to better prepare students for the future.

The good news: There's an uptick in the hiring of new teachers since the pink-slip frenzy in the wake of the Great Recession.

The bad news: The new hiring hasn't made up for the teacher shortfall. Attrition is high, and enrollment in teacher preparation programs has fallen some 35 percent over the past five years — a decrease of nearly 240,000 teachers in all.

Parts of most every state in America face troubling teacher shortages: the most frequent shortage areas are math, science, bilingual education and special education.

AARON SCHRANK/TPR

Last school year, Texas State Representative Diego Bernal visited every public school in his District 123. In a recent post on the website Medium, he shared some of what he heard from teachers on those 55 school visits. Bernal told Texas Public Radio’s Aaron Schrank he hopes that document will be a policy guide for legislative colleagues on both sides of the aisle, who he says talk a lot about how to improve education.

From Texas Standard:

Along with other Texas lawmakers,  state Rep. Diego Bernal, a Democrat from San Antonio, has been getting an earful from all sides on problems with public education in Texas.

But rather than taking someone else's word for it, he did what no other lawmaker has yet to do – he visited every single school in his district, 55 in all.

 


What if there was no homework for the entire school year?

A Texas teacher wrote a letter to parents of her second grade class telling them just that.

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