Education

Remember the MOOC?

Just a few years ago, the Massive Open Online Course was expected to reinvent higher education. Millions of people were signing up to watch Web-based, video lectures from the world's great universities. Some were completing real assignments, earning certificates and forming virtual study groups — all for free.

Surely the traditional college degree would instantly collapse.

Mexican-American toddlers born in the U.S. do not develop nearly as fast as white toddlers when it comes to language and pre-literacy skills. That's the main finding of a new study by the Institute of Human Development at the University of California, Berkeley.

GOP Takes First Step to End In-State Tuition for Undocumented

Apr 7, 2015
Courtesy: http://www.campbell.senate.state.tx.us/

[Editor’s note: This story has been updated to reflect further testimony and the subcommittee’s vote] 

After more than 11 hours of public testimony from witnesses overwhelmingly opposed to repealing a law that allows some undocumented students to pay in-state tuition, a senate subcommittee on border security voted along party lines early Tuesday morning to send the measure to the full Veterans Affairs and Military Installations committee. 

The legislation, Senate Bill 1819, by state Sen. Donna Campbell, R-New Braunfels, would repeal a 2001 provision that allows some undocumented immigrants to pay in-state tuition rates at public colleges and universities.

Texas Public Radio

AUSTIN — State senators are debating a contentious plan to repeal a Texas law granting in-state public university tuition to the children of some people in the United States illegally.

Democrats and Hispanic groups champion the law, while Republicans in the GOP-controlled Legislature have pledged to end it quickly. On Monday, the two sides clashed during a Senate subcommittee on border security meeting.

Sen. Donna Campbell defended her bill repealing the so-called “Texas DREAM Act.”

The Source: What Might Vouchers Mean For Texas

Apr 1, 2015
Credit: Wikicommons http://bit.ly/1CPNiYT

The latest effort to improve Texas education involves vouchers. Instead of being confined by zip codes, families could elect to send their children to private and specialty schools, and the dollars allocated to students follow them. 

While this plan would allow students to choose schools based on individual needs rather than their addresses, critics point out that vouchers may create more disparity.

Pages