Education

Mengwen Cao / KUT

The special session is underway, and of the 20 items Gov. Greg Abbott says he wants lawmakers to tackle, one is getting a lot of attention from teachers.

Courtesy Palo Alto College

When Palo Alto College began offering classes in 1985, it was San Antonio's only public higher education option available south of Highway 90. 

Wikimedia Commons (CC BY-SA 3.0) / http://bit.ly/2vzmlZy

An estimated 14 percent of the San Antonio population lives with a disability, according to census data from 2011-2015

The Texas Legislature’s special session starts Tuesday. At the top of Gov. Greg Abbott’s education agenda: school choice for special-needs students.

Pixabay http://bit.ly/2rNnIFl

Nearly 25 percent of people in San Antonio have obtained some college credit, but have not completed their program or degree.

A new, local initiative called Upgrade is working to help adults figure out how best to approach completing their college education.

Launched in April, the program's goal is two-fold: Higher educational attainment as a personal investment, to improve quality of life on the individual level, and as a means to spur overall economic development in San Antonio.

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