Education

NPR Ed
8:03 am
Fri September 12, 2014

For Teachers, Many Paths Into The Classroom ... Some Say Too Many

LA Johnson/NPR

Originally published on Fri September 12, 2014 12:16 pm

Hey, you there. You have a college degree? How'd you like to be a teacher?

Indiana has just approved a license that clears a new pathway to the teaching profession. It allows anyone with a bachelor's degree, a B average and approximately three years of related work experience to become a middle or high school teacher in a subject such as math, science or music, provided they pass a content test.

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NPR Ed
4:21 pm
Wed September 10, 2014

This Is Your Brain. This Is Your Brain On Music

Amir Pinkney-Jengkens, 8, is learning trombone through Harmony Project, a nonprofit that provides musical instruments and instruction to children in low-income communities. Recent research suggests that such musical education may help improve kids' ability to process speech.
Annie Tritt for NPR

Originally published on Thu September 11, 2014 10:55 am

Musical training doesn't just improve your ear for music — it also helps your ear for speech. That's the takeaway from an unusual new study published in The Journal of Neuroscience. Researchers found that kids who took music lessons for two years didn't just get better at playing the trombone or violin; they found that playing music also helped kids' brains process language.

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Education
11:52 pm
Wed July 16, 2014

A Push For Ethnic Studies In Texas Schools

Tony Diaz is a professor at Lone Star College and also an activist with the group Librotraficante. He helped lead a campaign to get the Texas Board of Education to endorse Mexican-American and other ethnic studies courses. (Laura Isensee/Houston Public Media)

Originally published on Wed July 16, 2014 2:20 pm

Ever since the civil rights movement in the 1960s, many educators, students and activists have pushed for more ethnic studies in public schools.

In 1968 at a San Francisco State University, students led the longest student strike in the country’s history calling for ethnic studies programs that accurately represented the student body and their needs. The student strike led to the establishment of the first school of ethnic studies in higher education.

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Education
5:57 am
Wed June 11, 2014

iPads Allow Kids With Challenges To Play In High School's Band

Jason Haughton sings an original tune composed by the PS 177 Technology Band.
Eric Westervelt NPR

Originally published on Thu June 12, 2014 9:40 am

There's a steady stream of hype surrounding the pluses and pitfalls of classroom tablet computers. But for a growing number of special education students tablets and their apps are proving transformative. The tablets aren't merely novel and fun. With guidance from creative teachers, they are helping to deepen engagement, communication, and creativity.

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Code Switch
11:43 am
Mon May 5, 2014

After Decades, A University By And For Latinos Will Shut Its Doors

The National Hispanic University sits in the shadow of the East San Jose foothills in a working-class Latino neighborhood.
Shereen Marisol Meraji

Originally published on Tue May 6, 2014 9:34 am

The National Hispanic University was created more than 30 years ago to educate first-generation college students from Latino backgrounds. Next year, the only school of its kind west of the Mississippi will close its doors.

NHU sits in the shadow of the East San Jose foothills in California's Silicon Valley. All the classrooms and faculty offices fit in one modern three-story building in the heart of a working-class Latino neighborhood. But the postwar elementary school right next door used to serve as the institution's hallowed halls.

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Paying For College
2:37 am
Thu April 24, 2014

When Money Trumps Need In College Admissions

For many low-income students, economic trends are making the prospect of getting into the college of their choice, and reaching graduation, even more difficult.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Thu April 24, 2014 11:51 am

At some schools, the admissions process itself can work against low-income students, according to Georgia Nugent, former president of Kenyon College and a senior fellow at the Council of Independent Colleges.

Nugent says during her tenure at Kenyon, there were low-income students at the bottom of the admissions list who sometimes weren't accepted so the school could make room for more affluent students.

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Education
3:16 pm
Tue April 22, 2014

Who's Getting Preschool Right? Researchers Point To Tulsa

Preschool student Stormy Frazier watches a science experiment unfold in Nikki Jones' classroom in Tulsa, Okla. You can learn more about preschool in Tulsa here.
John W. Poole NPR

Originally published on Tue April 22, 2014 5:38 pm

Many educators say quality early childhood education programs give young children a strong foundation for kindergarten and beyond.

But what does a high-quality preschool program look like? Early childhood education researchers point to Tulsa, Okla., as a school system that gets it right. NPR's education team went to Tulsa to find out what help sets the city's preschool program apart. You can read more about what they found — and visit a Tulsa preschool classroom, here.

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The Two-Way
7:23 pm
Tue April 8, 2014

Texas Education Agency Considers Adding Class On Mexican-Americans

Supporters of a proposal to add a Mexican-American studies course as a statewide high school elective arrive for a Texas Board of Education hearing on Tuesday.
Eric Gay AP

Originally published on Tue April 8, 2014 6:33 pm

The Texas Board of Education heard testimony this afternoon about a proposed Mexican-American studies elective high school class that could be offered state wide.

As the AP reports, proponents of the of the program say it will offer students a deeper understanding of the state's history. The AP adds:

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Code Switch
3:05 pm
Thu April 3, 2014

For Latino Parents, Bilingual Classrooms Aren't Just About Language

This April 3, 2013 photo shows the inside of a classroom at Miami's Coral Way K-8 Center, the nation's largest bilingual school.
Lynne Sladky AP

Originally published on Thu April 3, 2014 4:41 pm

Right now, across the country, parents are in the midst of trying to get their children enrolled in bilingual classrooms for next September.

The motivation is usually straightforward. Parents want their kids to learn a foreign language. The thinking is that a second language will bring significant cultural and economic advantages.

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Paying For College
12:46 pm
Tue March 25, 2014

Some Common Misconceptions About Paying For College

iStockphoto

Originally published on Tue March 25, 2014 11:24 am

In reporting on students navigating the maze of college costs and financial aid, I kept running into misconceptions about paying for a degree. Here are some of the most common ones:

Low-income students get most of their college financial aid needs met and rich kids don't have to worry, so it's mainly the middle class that gets squeezed.

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